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Relationship between natural resources and institutions

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Abstract

This article analyses through a rent seeking model, the relationship between institutions' quality and natural resources. Depending on the institutions quality, each country has a specific structural capacity to stand natural resources dependency. It is shown that for each country, a threshold exists, such that beyond this point, any additional amounts of natural resources begin to have a negative impact on institutions. As the stock of natural resources increases, this improves the expected profitability of rent seeking, which in turn lowers the quality of institutions. The mechanism comes from a new balance of power within the country. However, the institutional degradation's intensity is determined by social interactions and depends on both the resources nature and their appropriability level. The inverse U-shaped curve obtained from empirical studies presented in this article supports the natural resources non-monotonic effect on institutions found in the model.

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File URL: ftp://mse.univ-paris1.fr/pub/mse/CES2008/Bla08060.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne in its series Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne with number bla08060.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:bla08060

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Keywords: Natural resources; institutions; rent seeking.;

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Cited by:
  1. Mathieu Couttenier & Marc Sangnier, 2010. "Living in the garden of Eden: Mineral resources foster individualism," PSE Working Papers halshs-00564920, HAL.
  2. Felipe Starosta de Waldemar, 2010. "How costly is rent-seeking to diversification : an empirical approach," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 10008, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  3. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00564920 is not listed on IDEAS

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