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God and the Global Economy: Religion and Attitudes Toward Trade and Immigration in the United States

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  • Joseph Daniels

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Marquette University)

  • Marc von der Ruhr

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Saint Norbert College)

Abstract

Using the results of a national identity survey, we test the impact of religious affiliation on trade and immigration-policy preferences of U.S. residents while controlling for individual level of skill, political ideology, and other important demographic characteristics. Our results show that religion is an important determinant of international-policy preferences as individuals who are pre-Vatican II Catholic or members of fundamentalist Protestant are more likely to prefer policies that restrict imports and immigration. Religiosity, in contrast, has a seperate effect on moderating attitudes toward immigration. In addition, we find evidence of denominational effects among African Americans in that members of fundamentalist denominations tend to favor policies that restrict imports while others do not, implying that statistical results commonly attributed to racial effects may actually be a religious effect.

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File URL: http://www.busadm.mu.edu/mrq/workingpapers/wpaper0501.pdf
File Function: First version, 2005
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Marquette University, Center for Global and Economic Studies and Department of Economics in its series Working Papers and Research with number 0501.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2005
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in the Socio-Economic Review, Vol 3, 2005, pages 467-489
Handle: RePEc:mrq:wpaper:0501

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  1. Luigi Guiso & Paola Sapienza & Luigi Zingales, 2002. "People's Opium? Religion and Economic Attitudes," NBER Working Papers 9237, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mayda, Anna Maria & Rodrik, Dani, 2001. "Why are Some People (and Countries) More Protectionist than Others?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2960, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Delhey, Jan & Newton, Kenneth, 2002. "Who trusts? The origins of social trust in seven nations," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Social Structure and Social Reporting FS III 02-402, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
  4. Micahael Tomz & Jason Wittenberg & Gary King, . "Clarify: Software for Interpreting and Presenting Statistical Results," Journal of Statistical Software, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(i01).
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Cited by:
  1. Michael Fertig & Jan Brenner, 2006. "Identifying the Determinants of Attitudes towards Immigrants - A Structural Cross-Country Analysis," RWI Discussion Papers 0047, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
  2. Michael D. Makowsky, 2009. "Religion, Clubs, and Emergent Social Divides," Working Papers 2009-03, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised May 2010.

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