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A National Study of Neighborhood Safety, Outdoor Play, Television Viewing, and Obesity in Preschool Children

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  • Hillary L. Burdette
  • Robert C. Whitaker
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    Abstract

    Do preschool children have a higher prevalence of obesity, spend less time playing outdoors, and spend more time watching television when they live in a neighborhood that their mothers perceive as unsafe? This study of three-year-olds in 20 U.S. cities found that if mothers perceive their neighborhood as unsafe, their children tend to watch more television, but they are no more likely to be obese and do not spend any less time playing outdoors than children in safer neighborhoods. Researchers used data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a birth cohort study of nearly 5,000 children born in 20 large U.S. cities from 1998 to 2000.

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    File URL: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/116/3/657?ct
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Mathematica Policy Research in its series Mathematica Policy Research Reports with number 4706.

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    Date of creation: 30 Sep 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:4706

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    Postal: Mathematica Policy Research P.O. Box 2393 Princeton, NJ 08543-2393 Attn: Communications
    Fax: (609) 799-0005
    Web page: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/
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    Keywords: Preschool Obesity;

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    Cited by:
    1. Rachel Tolbert Kimbro & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn & Sara McLanahan, 2010. "Neighborhood Context, Poverty, and Urban Children’s Outdoor Play," Working Papers 1226, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..
    2. Thomas Vartanian & Linda Houser, 2012. "The Effects of Childhood SNAP Use and Neighborhood Conditions on Adult Body Mass Index," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(3), pages 1127-1154, August.
    3. Davison, Kirsten K. & Nishi, Akihiro & Kranz, Sibylle & Wyckoff, Lynae & May, John J. & Earle-Richardson, Giulia B. & Strogatz, David S. & Jenkins, Paul L., 2012. "Associations among social capital, parenting for active lifestyles, and youth physical activity in rural families living in upstate New York," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(8), pages 1488-1496.

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