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Academic Inbreeding and Research Productivity in Australian Law Schools

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  • Vinod Mishra
  • Russell Smyth

Abstract

This study compares the research productivity of inbred and non-inbred faculty employed at Australian law schools. The sample consists of 429 academics, employed at 21 law schools. To measure research productivity we use both articles and pages published in top law journals, defined in six different ways, as well as total citations and two different citation indices. We report results including, and excluding, publications in the home law review. We find evidence that silver-corded faculty outperform other faculty on one of the measures of research productivity, once the endogeneity of academic seniority and grant history is addressed, but this finding is not robust across alternative measures of research productivity. We find that there is no statistically significant difference between the research productivity of inbred and non-inbred faculty. This finding is robust to a range of different ways of measuring research productivity and alternative econometric approaches, including using two-stage least squares to address the endogeneity of academic seniority and grant history.

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File URL: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/eco/research/papers/2012/4612academicmishrasmyth.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Monash University, Department of Economics in its series Monash Economics Working Papers with number 46-12.

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Length: 56 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2012-46

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Postal: Department of Economics, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
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Keywords: Research productivity; law schools; Australia; academic inbreeding;

References

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  1. repec:taf:jnlbes:v:30:y:2012:i:1:p:67-80 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Eisenberg, Theodore & Wells, Martin T, 2000. "Inbreeding in Law School Hiring: Assessing the Performance of Faculty Hired from Within," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 369-88, January.
  3. Rex J. Pjesky & Daniel Sutter, 2011. "Does the Lack of a Profit Motive Affect Hiring in Academe? Evidence from the Market for Lawyers," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(4), pages 1053-1084, October.
  4. Cruz-Castro, Laura & Sanz-Menéndez, Luis, 2010. "Mobility versus job stability: Assessing tenure and productivity outcomes," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 27-38, February.
  5. Muriel Niederle & Lise Vesterlund, 2005. "Do Women Shy Away From Competition? Do Men Compete Too Much?," NBER Working Papers 11474, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. David L. Anderson & John Tressler, 2008. "Research Output in New Zealand Economics Department 2000-2006," Working Papers in Economics 08/05, University of Waikato, Department of Economics.
  7. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Are More Senior Academics Really More Research Productive than Junior Academics? Evidence from Australian Law Schools," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 47-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  8. Bhattacharya, Mita & Smyth, Russell, 2001. "Aging and Productivity among Judges: Some Empirical Evidence from the High Court of Australia," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(2), pages 199-212, June.
  9. Eisenberg, Theodore & Wells, Martin T, 1998. "Ranking and Explaining the Scholarly Impact of Law Schools," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(2), pages 373-413, June.
  10. Buchmueller, Thomas C. & Dominitz, Jeff & Lee Hansen, W., 1999. "Graduate training and the early career productivity of Ph.D. economists," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 65-77, February.
  11. Jaeyong Song & Paul Almeida & Geraldine Wu, 2003. "Learning--by--Hiring: When Is Mobility More Likely to Facilitate Interfirm Knowledge Transfer?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(4), pages 351-365, April.
  12. Cawley, John, 2011. "A Guide and Advice for Economists on the U.S. Junior Academic Job Market (2011-2012 Edition)," IZA Discussion Papers 5984, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Wendy Stock & Richard Alston & Martin Milkman, 2000. "The academic labor market for economists: 1995–96," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 28(2), pages 164-185, June.
  14. Hugo Horta & Francisco M. Veloso & Rócio Grediaga, 2010. "Navel Gazing: Academic Inbreeding and Scientific Productivity," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 56(3), pages 414-429, March.
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