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Elite Political Instability and Economic Growth: An Empirical Evidence from the Baltic States

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  • Ladislava Grochova

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics, Mendel University in Brno)

  • Ludek Kouba

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Faculty of Business and Economics, Mendel University in Brno)

Abstract

The growth theory of new political economics defines some factors that are necessary for economic growth among which political stability. There are distinguished two types of political instability - elite and non-elite - in topical literature. While non-elite political instability concerns about violent coups, riots or civil wars, elite political instability is represented with "soft changes" such as government breakdowns, fragile majority or minority governments. We don't doubt the importance of general political stability for successful economic development. Nevertheless, we don Ìt agree that elite political instability can be understood as an insuperable obstacle for it. The aim of the paper is to disprove the hypothesis that elite political stability is a necessary condition for economic growth. Equally with other papers, a number of government changes is used as a proxy of elite political instability. The disproof of the hypothesis is demonstrated on data from the Baltic states where a number of government changes takes place and still fast economic growth could be seen within last two decades. The model has a form of augmented production function and includes growth rates of investments, exports, and labour as independent variables and government changes as an elite political instability dummy variable. The data resulting from estimations applying GMM and GLS because of endogeneity and autocorrelation problems are statistically significant for all three countries and confirm our hypothesis that elite political stability is a necessary condition for economic growth.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics in its series MENDELU Working Papers in Business and Economics with number 2010-01.

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Length: 15
Date of creation: Feb 2010
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Handle: RePEc:men:wpaper:01_2010

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Keywords: new political economics; political instability; elite political instability; production function; single equation; Baltic states;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ladislava Grochova & Ludek Kouba, 2010. "Elite Political Instability and Economic Growth: An Empirical Evidence from the Baltic States," MENDELU Working Papers in Business and Economics 2010-01, Mendel University in Brno, Faculty of Business and Economics.
  2. Hwa-Taek Lee & Gawon Yoon, 2013. "Does purchasing power parity hold sometimes? Regime switching in real exchange rates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(16), pages 2279-2294, June.
  3. Petr Rozmahel & Ludek Kouba & Ladislava Grochová & Nikola Najman, 2013. "Integration of Central and Eastern European Countries: Increasing EU Heterogeneity?," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 9, WWWforEurope.

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