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Eine Blaupause für eine nachhaltige Rentenreform in Deutschland

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  • Axel Börsch-Supan

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    (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA))

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    Abstract

    Auch nach der Rentenreform 2001 wird das Alterseinkommen im wesentlichen von der gesetzlichen Rentenversicherung nach dem Umlageverfahren getragen werden. Die weiterhin unterschätzte Alterung der Bevölkerung und die weiterhin bestehenden Anreizeffekte auf das Arbeitskräfteangebot werden jedoch nach wie vor die gesetzliche Rentenversicherung unter großen Druck setzen. Dieses Papier vertritt den Standpunkt, dass eine nachhaltige Sanierung der Rentenversicherung nur erreichbar ist, wenn sie auf den folgenden drei sich gegenseitig bedingenden Elementen aufbaut: Erstens eine reformierte umlagefinanzierte Pflichtversicherungssäule, die versicherungsmathematisch angepasst ist, der ein transparentes Kontensystem zugrunde liegt, und die die Beitragssätze auf ihrer jetzigen Höhe einfriert; zweitens eine kapitalgedeckte Säule, die die anstehende Alterslast finanziert und im Stil von Gruppenversicherungen von Arbeitgebern und Arbeitnehmern gemeinsam organisiert wird; drittens erweitert durch Umverteilungselemente, die eine Mindestrente garantieren und die Bildung von Humankapital verstärken, sowie eine einheitliche und in sich konsistente steuerliche Behandlung.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy in its series MEA discussion paper series with number 02001.

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    Date of creation: 02 Jan 2002
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    Handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:02001

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    Postal: Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy, Amalienstraße 33, 80799 München, Germany
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    References

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    1. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Schmidt-Hebbel, Klaus, 1995. "Pension reform and growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1471, The World Bank.
    2. Sikandar Siddiqui, 1997. "The pension incentive to retire: Empirical evidence for West Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 463-486.
    3. Börsch-Supan, Axel H. & Heiss, Florian & Ludwig, Alexander & Winter, Joachim, 2003. "Pension reform, capital markets and the rate of return," Munich Reprints in Economics 20200, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    4. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Social Security and Retirement," NBER Working Papers 7830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Borsch-Supan, Axel & Schnabel, Reinhold, 1998. "Social Security and Declining Labor-Force Participation in Germany," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 173-78, May.
    6. Brunner, Johann K., 1993. "Redistribution and the efficiency of the pay-as-you-go pension system," Discussion Papers, Series 1 265, University of Konstanz, Department of Economics.
    7. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Tumbarello, Patrizia & Palacios, Robert, 1999. "Pension systems in the Middle East and North Africa: A window of opportunity," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 99-44, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim & Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    8. Axel Borsch-Supan, 1998. "Incentive Effects of Social Security on Labor Force Participation: Evidence in Germany and Across Europe," NBER Working Papers 6780, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Börsch-Supan, Axel, 1998. "Incentive Effects of Social Security on Labor Force Participation: Evidence in Germany and Across Europe," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 98-29, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim & Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    10. Martin Feldstein, 1998. "Privatizing Social Security," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number feld98-1, July.
    11. Browning, Edgar K, 1975. "Why the Social Insurance Budget Is Too Large in a Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 13(3), pages 373-88, September.
    12. Robert Holzmann, 1996. "Pension Reform, Financial Market Development, and Economic Growth," IMF Working Papers 96/94, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:
    1. Axel Boersch-Supan & Christina B. Wilke, 2004. "The German Public Pension System: How it Was, How it Will Be," NBER Working Papers 10525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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