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Selection and Reporting Bias in Household Surveys of Child Labor: Evidence from Tanzania

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  • Yohanne N. Kidolezi
  • Jessica A. Holmes

    ()

  • Hugo Ñopo
  • Paul M. Sommers

    ()

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File URL: http://www.middlebury.edu/services/econ/repec/mdl/ancoec/0517.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Middlebury College, Department of Economics in its series Middlebury College Working Paper Series with number 0517.

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Length: 18pages
Date of creation: Aug 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mdl:mdlpap:0517

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  1. Gustafsson-Wright, Emily & Pyne, Hnin Hnin, 2002. "Gender dimensions of child labor and street children in Brazil," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2897, The World Bank.
  2. Ranjan Ray, 2002. "The Determinants of Child Labour and Child Schooling in Ghana," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 11(4), pages 561-590, December.
  3. Kathleen Beegle & Rajeev Dehejia & Roberta Gatti, 2009. "Why Should We Care About Child Labor?: The Education, Labor Market, and Health Consequences of Child Labor," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
  4. C Arndt & J D Lewis, 2000. "The Macro Implications of HIV/AIDS in South Africa: A Preliminary Assessment," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 68(5), pages 380-392, December.
  5. Peter Jensen & Helena Skyt Nielsen, 1997. "Child labour or school attendance? Evidence from Zambia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 407-424.
  6. Lopez-Acevedo, Gladys, 2002. "School attendance and child labor in Ecuador," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2939, The World Bank.
  7. Canagarajah, Sudharshan & Coulombe, Harold, 1997. "Child labor and schooling in Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1844, The World Bank.
  8. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 1997. "Family size, schooling and child labor in Peru - An empirical analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 387-405.
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