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On the Links between Violent Conflict and Household Poverty: How Much Do We Really Know?

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  • Patricia Justino

    ()
    (Institute of Development Studies at Sussex)

Abstract

This paper assesses the usefulness of a new emerging body of work on the micro-level analysis of conflict and violence in advancing our current understanding of the relationship between violent conflict and household poverty. Micro-level empirical evidence on the relationship between violent conflict and poverty has been scarce and at times contradictory. This field of research has, however, grown significantly in recent years and evidence is slowly starting to accumulate. The paper makes use of new findings to propose a framework to understand fundamental transmission mechanisms from violent conflict through to household poverty, as well as the potential impact of household poverty on conflict. This framework suggests three key self-reinforcing mechanisms through which violent conflict may impact on the poor: through the impact on assets and livelihoods, through education and health effects, and through the displacement of populations and the breakdown of socioeconomic networks. In addition, the paper conceptualises the extent to which poverty can act as a trigger for violent conflict owing to lack of choice of those involved, widespread social discontent amongst different population groups and the search for better socio-economic opportunities. We expect this framework to act as a benchmark for further work on the analysis of the relationship between poverty and violent conflict, including much-needed efforts at gathering further empirical evidence.

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File URL: http://www.microconflict.eu/publications/RWP1_PJ.pdf
File Function: First version, 2007
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict in its series Research Working Papers with number 1.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mcn:rwpapr:1

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Related research

Keywords: Household poverty; violent conflict; micro analysis;

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Cited by:
  1. Carlos Bozzoli & Tilman Brück & Tony Muhumuza, 2011. "Activity Choices of Internally Displaced Persons and Returnees: Quantitative Survey Evidence from Post-War Northern Uganda," HiCN Working Papers 98, Households in Conflict Network.
  2. Serneels, Pieter & Verpoorten, Marijke, 2012. "The Impact of Armed Conflict on Economic Performance: Evidence from Rwanda," IZA Discussion Papers 6737, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Christopher Blattman & Edward Miguel, 2009. "Civil War: A Review of Fifty Years of Research," Working Papers id:2231, eSocialSciences.
  4. Domingues, Patrick, 2011. "Civil War Exposure And School Enrolment:Evidence From The Mozambican Civil War," NEPS Working Papers 1/2011, Network of European Peace Scientists.
  5. Christopher Blattman & Edward Miguel, 2009. "Civil War," NBER Working Papers 14801, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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