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A Model of Trickle Down Through Learning

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  • K Blackburn
  • N Bose

Abstract

This paper presents an analysis of income distribution based on an overlapping generations model of imperfect capital markets, technological non-convexities and information acquisition. Heterogeneous, altruistic agents apply for loans from financial intermediaries to undertake risky investment projects. Borrowing is prohibited below a critical level of wealth that depends on agents' evaluation of risk which is updated over time according to the arrival of new information. This process of learning governs the transition of lineage wealth and, with it, the dynamics of income distribution. In general, limiting outcomes depend on initial conditions that determine the extent to which class divisions persist in multiple steady state equilibria. Such divisions may vanish if the the initial distribution satisfies certain criteria.

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File URL: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/medialibrary/cgbcr/discussionpapers/dpcgbcr6.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester in its series Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series with number 06.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:06

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  1. Boyan Jovanovic & Yaw Nyarko, 1994. "Learning By Doing and the Choice of Technology," NBER Working Papers 4739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Lang, William W. & Nakamura, Leonard I., 1990. "The dynamics of credit markets in a model with learning," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 305-318, October.
  3. Bénabou, Roland, 1993. "Heterogeneity, Stratification and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 815, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Alberto Alesina & Dani Rodrik, 1991. "Distributive Politics and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 3668, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Fernandez, R. & Rogerson, R., 1992. "Income Distribution, Communities and the Quality of Public Education: A Policy Analysis," Papers 1, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  6. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52, January.
  7. Atkinson, A B, 1997. "Bringing Income Distribution in from the Cold," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(441), pages 297-321, March.
  8. Piketty, Thomas, 1997. "The Dynamics of the Wealth Distribution and the Interest Rate with Credit Rationing," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(2), pages 173-89, April.
  9. Perotti, Roberto, 1993. "Political Equilibrium, Income Distribution, and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(4), pages 755-76, October.
  10. Andreoni, James, 1989. "Giving with Impure Altruism: Applications to Charity and Ricardian Equivalence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1447-58, December.
  11. Banerjee, Abhijit V & Newman, Andrew F, 1993. "Occupational Choice and the Process of Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(2), pages 274-98, April.
  12. Persson, T. & Tabellini, G., 1993. "Is Inequality Harmful for Growth," Papers 537, Stockholm - International Economic Studies.
  13. Acemoglu, Daron & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 1997. "Was Prometheus Unbound by Chance? Risk, Diversification, and Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(4), pages 709-51, August.
  14. Aghion, Philippe & Bolton, Patrick, 1997. "A Theory of Trickle-Down Growth and Development," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(2), pages 151-72, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Keith Blackburn & Rashmi Sarmah, 2006. "Red Tape, Corruption and Finance," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0639, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  2. Blackburn, Keith & Forgues-Puccio, Gonzalo F., 2007. "Distribution and development in a model of misgovernance," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(6), pages 1534-1563, August.
  3. Dimitrios Varvarigos & Keith Blackburn, 2005. "Growth, Uncertainty and Finance," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2005 12, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
  4. Keith Blackburn & David Chivers, 2013. "Fearing the Worst: The Importance of Uncertainty for Inequality," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 182, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  5. Keith Blackburn & Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2005. "Growth, Uncertainty and Finance," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0525, Economics, The University of Manchester.
  6. Soyolmaa Batbekh and & Keith Blackburn, 2008. "On the Macroeconomics of Microfi?nance," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 106, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  7. K Blackburn & D Varvarigos, 2005. "Growth, Uncertainty and Finance," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 48, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  8. Keith Blackburn & Rashmi Sarmah, 2006. "Red Tape, Corruption and Finance," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 82, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.

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