Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Fisher Effect: A Review of the Literature

Contents:

Author Info

  • Arusha Cooray

    ()

Abstract

The Fisher hypothesis has been a much debated topic. Over the years the hypothesis debated and the techniques used have changed. While the majority of early studies on the Fisher effect concentrated primarily on confirming the long and distributed lag in expectations formation, subsequent work saw the integration of the Fisher hypothesis with the theories of rational expectations and efficient markets. With the incorporation of these theories in the Fisher hypothesis, the methodological advances involved examining the time series properties of the variables in question. This survey reviews previous work from this perspective. In addition, the studies pertaining to developing economies and possible explanations for the failure of the Fisher effect are also reviewed.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.econ.mq.edu.au/research/2002/6-2002Cooray.PDF
File Function: First Version, 2002
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Macquarie University, Department of Economics in its series Research Papers with number 0206.

as in new window
Length: 25 pages.
Date of creation: Sep 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mac:wpaper:0206

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Sydney NSW 2109
Web page: http://www.econ.mq.edu.au/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Fisher Effect; adaptive expectations; rational expectations;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Ka-Fu Wong & Hai-Jun Wu, 2003. "Testing Fisher hypothesis in long horizons for G7 and eight Asian countries.1," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(14), pages 917-923.
  2. Shabbir Ahmad, 2010. "The long-run Fisher effect in developing economies," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 268-275, October.
  3. Nicolas Million, 2006. "Changements de régime pour la persistance et la dynamique du taux d'intérêt réel américain," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques v06067, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  4. Million, N., 2008. "Test simultané de la non-stationnarité et de la non-linéarité : une application au taux d.intérêt réel américain," Working papers 201, Banque de France.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mac:wpaper:0206. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Helen Boneham).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.