Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Meet the Parents? Family Size and the Geographic Proximity Between Adult Children and Older Mothers in Sweden

Contents:

Author Info

  • Holmlund, Helena
  • Rainer, Helmut
  • Siedler, Thomas

Abstract

The aim of this study is to estimate the causal effect of family size on the proximity between older mothers and adult children by using a large administrative data set from Sweden. Our main results show that adult children in Sweden are not constrained by sibship size in choosing where to live: for families with more than one child, sibship size does not affect child-mother proximity. For aging parents, however, having fewer children reduces the probability of having at least one child living nearby, which is likely to have consequences for the intensity of intergenerational contact and eldercare.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Munich, Department of Economics in its series Munich Reprints in Economics with number 19441.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Demography 3 50(2013): pp. 903-931
Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19441

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Ludwigstr. 28, 80539 Munich, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-3405
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3510
Web page: http://www.vwl.uni-muenchen.de
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Konrad, Kai A & Künemund, Harald & Lommerud, Kjell Erik & Robledo, Julio R, 1999. "Geography of the Family," CEPR Discussion Papers 2312, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Machin, Stephen & Pelkonen, Panu & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2008. "Education and Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 3845, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. David A. Jaeger & Holger Bonin & Thomas Dohmen & Armin Falk & David Huffman & Uwe Sunde, 2007. "Direct Evidence on Risk Attitudes and Migration," Working Papers, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary 50, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  4. Dohmen, Thomas J. & Falk, Armin & Huffman, David & Sunde, Uwe, 2012. "The intergenerational transmission of risk and trust attitudes," Munich Reprints in Economics, University of Munich, Department of Economics 20051, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  5. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-18 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Angrist, Joshua D & Evans, William N, 1998. "Children and Their Parents' Labor Supply: Evidence from Exogenous Variation in Family Size," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 450-77, June.
  7. Francesca Michielin & Clara Mulder, 2007. "Geographical distances between adult children and their parents in the Netherlands," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(22), pages 655-678, December.
  8. Kenneth Couch & Mary Daly & Douglas Wolf, 1999. "Time? money? both? the allocation of resources to older Parents," Demography, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 219-232, May.
  9. Merril Silverstein, 1995. "Stability and change in temporal distance between the elderly and their children," Demography, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 29-45, February.
  10. Åslund, Olof & Grönqvist, Hans, 2010. "Family size and child outcomes: Is there really no trade-off?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 130-139, January.
  11. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2007. "Small Family, Smart Family? Family Size and the IQ Scores of Young Men," IZA Discussion Papers 3011, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2010. "Family Location and Caregiving Patterns from an International Perspective," CESifo Working Paper Series 2989, CESifo Group Munich.
  13. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1980. "Testing the Quantity-Quality Fertility Model: The Use of Twins as a Natural Experiment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 227-40, January.
  14. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1994. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," NBER Technical Working Papers 0151, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2006. "O Brother, Where Art Thou?: The Effects of Having a Sibling on Geographic Mobility and Labor Market Outcomes," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 608, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  16. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy & Analia Schlosser, 2010. "Multiple Experiments for the Causal Link between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(4), pages 773-824, October.
  17. Robert Schoeni & Mary Ofstedal, 2010. "Key themes in research on the demography of aging," Demography, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages S5-S15, March.
  18. Robert Moffitt, 2005. "Remarks on the analysis of causal relationships in population research," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 91-108, February.
  19. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2005. "The More the Merrier? The Effect of Family Size and Birth Order on Children's Education," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 120(2), pages 669-700, May.
  20. Jacob Cheadle & Paul Amato & Valarie King, 2010. "Patterns of nonresident father contact," Demography, Springer, vol. 47(1), pages 205-225, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19441. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Alexandra Frank).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.