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Central school exit exams and labor-market outcomes

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  • Piopiunik, Marc
  • Schwerdt, Guido
  • Wößmann, Ludger

Abstract

Many countries use centralized exit exams as a governance devise of the school system. While abundant evidence suggests positive effects of central exams on achievement tests, previous research on university-bound students shows no effects on subsequent earnings. We suggest that labor-market effects may be more imminent for students leaving school directly for the labor market and, on rigid labor markets, for unemployment. Exploiting variation in exit-exam systems across German states, we find that central exams are indeed associated with higher earnings for students from the school type directly bound for the labor market, as well as with lower unemployment.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Munich, Department of Economics in its series Munich Reprints in Economics with number 19325.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Publication status: Published in European Journal of Political Economy 31(2013): pp. 93-108
Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19325

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