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Employment Contract Matching: An Analysis of Dual Earner Couples and Working Households

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  • Sarah Brown

    ()

  • Lisa Farrell
  • John G Sessions

Abstract

We explore the significance of intra-couple and intra -household influences on three broad types of employment contracts: self-employment, performance related pay, and salaried employment. Individuals may pool income risk with their partners by holding a diversified portfolio of employment contracts, introducing intra-household risk pooling. Alternatively, employment contract matching may occur whereby individuals within couples or households are employed under similar contracts. Our empirical analysis, based on cross-section data drawn from the British Family Expenditure Surveys 1996 to 2000, provides evidence of employment contract matching both within dual earner couples and, to a lesser extent, in the context of working household members.

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File URL: http://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/RePEc/lec/leecon/econ01-9.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Leicester in its series Discussion Papers in Economics with number 01/9.

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Date of creation: Nov 2001
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Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:01/9

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Related research

Keywords: Dual Earner Couples; Employment Contract Matching; Self-employment; Assortative Mating;

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Cited by:
  1. Sarah Brown & Lisa Farrell & Mark N. Harris & John G. Sessions, 2006. "Risk preference and employment contract type," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 849-863.
  2. Hannu Tervo & Hannu Niittykangas, 2011. "Self-employment transitions at older ages in different local labor markets," ERSA conference papers ersa11p764, European Regional Science Association.

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