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Does Provision of an Evidence-Based Information Change Public Willingness to Accept a Screening Test ?

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  • Gianfranco DOMENIGHETTI
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    Abstract

    The basic requirement for patient decision making is the provision by the physician of an essential relevant and understandable information (Evidence Based) allowing him to decide whether he wish or not to receive the proposed treatment. This analysis shows that the willingness to undergo a doubtful screening test (about 70 % false positive responses) for a rare cancer by the general population change dramatically (60% versus 13,5%) according to the quality of information provided. This result, facing the impressive increase of diagnostic and screening procedures, could have important economical, ethical, clinical, public health and legal implications.

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    File URL: http://www.hec.unil.ch/deep/textes/9901.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP in its series Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) with number 9901.

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    Length: 9 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 1999
    Date of revision:
    Publication status: Published in Health Expectations, vol. 3 (2), 2000, pp. 145-150
    Handle: RePEc:lau:crdeep:9901

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    Postal: Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP, Internef, CH-1015 Lausanne
    Phone: ++41 21 692.33.64
    Fax: ++41 21 692.33.05
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    Web page: http://www.hec.unil.ch/deep/publications/cahiers/series
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    Related research

    Keywords: health care markets; information; decision making; doctor-patient relationship; screening; diagnostic procedures; evidence based medicine; public health;

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    Cited by:
    1. Zo� Philips & David K. Whynes & Mark Avis, 2006. "Testing the construct validity of willingness to pay valuations using objective information about risk and health benefit," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(2), pages 195-204.
    2. Karine Lamiraud & Konrade von Bremen & Cam Donaldson, 2009. "The impact of information on patient preferences in different delivery patterns : a contingent valuation study of prescription versus OTC drugs," Working Papers 0901, University of Lausanne, Institute of Health Economics and Management (IEMS).

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