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Runoff vs. plurality

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  • Emanuele Bracco
  • Alberto Brugnoli

Abstract

Plurality and runoff systems oer very different incentives to parties and coalition of voters, and demand different political strategies from potential candidates and chief executives. Italian mayors and city councils are elected with a different electoral system according to the locality's population, while municipalities are otherwise treated identically in terms of funding and powers. We exploit this institutional feature to test how the presence of different electoral systems affects the central government decisions on grants, and the local government decisions on local taxes. We find evidence that the upper-tier governments favour runoff-elected mayors, and that runoff-elected mayors levy lower taxes. This is broadly consistent with the literature on runoff and plurality rule electoral systems.

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Paper provided by Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department in its series Working Papers with number 23767067.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:23767067

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Cited by:
  1. Bracco, Emanuele & Redoano, Michela & Porcelli, Francesco, 2012. "Incumbent Effects and Partisan Alignment in Local Elections: a Regression Discontinuity Analysis Using Italian Data," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 87, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
  2. repec:cge:warwcg:86 is not listed on IDEAS

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