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Is spatial mobility a reproduction mechanism of inequality? An empirical analysis of the job search behavior and the international mobility of students and re-cent graduates

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  • Fabian Kratz

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    (Bavarian State Institute for Higher Education Research and Planning)

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    Abstract

    Concentrating on the social origin, determinants of international mobility of students and recent graduates are identified, drawing on a combination of the microeconomic human capital model as well as the job-search-theory. The analysis is based on the Bavarian Graduate Study (Bayerisches Absolventen Panel, BAP), a representative data base for a wide array of fields of study at Bavarian universities and universities of applied sciences. Methods of multilevel modeling are employed to identify individual differences in the spatial mobility propensities of students and young graduates. First, analyzing the determinants of international mobility of students revealed the following associations. The younger the students, the higher the likelihood to study abroad. This propensity is also positively associated with parents’ status. Apart from that, students from universities display a significantly higher migration propensity than students from universities of applied sciences. Second, considering differences in the emigration propensities after graduation, our results imply that the likelihood of working abroad is contingent on a high social origin, being a single, graduating at a lower age. Furthermore, migration experiences in the past and competencies in foreign languages show a positive impact. Consequently, international mobility both during the studies and upon entrance into the labor market is significantly influenced by the social origin. In addition to this direct effect, the higher likelihood of students and graduates with a favorable social background to experience mobility in early stages increases their propensity to go abroad again indirectly, too, as a mediator. The same holds true for the readiness to move for a job as indicated by the radius considered when searching for a job. As a result, the range of opportunities resulting from the combined effects of a high social origin and previous migration experiences resembles a sophisticated mechanism contributing to the reproduction of social inequality.

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    File URL: http://www2.almalaurea.it/universita/pubblicazioni/wp/pdf/wp26.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2011
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium in its series Working Papers with number 26.

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    Length: 16
    Date of creation: Sep 2011
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:laa:wpaper:26

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    Web page: http://www.almalaurea.it

    Related research

    Keywords: international mobility; students; graduates; social origin; inequality; job search;

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    1. Alessandra Faggian & Philip McCann & Stephen Sheppard, 2007. "Some Evidence That Women Are More Mobile Than Men: Gender Differences In U.K. Graduate Migration Behavior," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 517-539.
    2. Alessandra Faggian & Philip McCann & Stephen Sheppard, 2006. "An analysis of ethnic differences in UK graduate migration behaviour," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 461-471, June.
    3. Lemistre, Philippe & Moreau, Nicolas, 2006. "Spatial Mobility and Returns to Education: Some Evidence from a Sample of French Youth," IZA Discussion Papers 2369, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Herzog, Henry W, Jr & Hofler, Richard A & Schlottmann, Alan M, 1985. "Life on the Frontier: Migrant Information, Earnings and Past Mobility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(3), pages 373-82, August.
    5. Chiswick, Barry R, 1991. "Speaking, Reading, and Earnings among Low-Skilled Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 149-70, April.
    6. Alden Speare, 1974. "Residential satisfaction as an intervening variable in residential mobility," Demography, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 173-188, May.
    7. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-73, October.
    8. Viktor Venhorst & Jouke Van Dijk & Leo Van Wissen, 2010. "Do The Best Graduates Leave The Peripheral Areas Of The Netherlands?," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 101(5), pages 521-537, December.
    9. Alessandra Faggian & Philip McCann, 2009. "Human capital, graduate migration and innovation in British regions," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(2), pages 317-333, March.
    10. Molho, Ian, 1986. "Theories of Migration: A Review," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 33(4), pages 396-419, November.
    11. DaVanzo, Julie, 1983. "Repeat Migration in the United States: Who Moves Back and Who Moves On?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(4), pages 552-59, November.
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