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Lost in Transition? The returns to education acquired under communism 15 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall

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  • Lorenzo Rocco

    ()
    (University of Padova)

  • Giorgio Brunello

    (University of Padova, Cesifo; IZA)

  • Elena Crivellaro

    (University of Padova and LSE)

Abstract

Using data for 23 economies in Eastern and Western Europe, we find evidence that having studied under communism is relatively penalized in the economies of the late 2000s. This evidence, however, is limited to males and to primary and secondary education, and holds for eight CEE economies but not for the East Germans who have studied in the former German Democratic Republic. We also find that post-secondary education acquired under communism yields higher, not lower, payoffs than similar education in Western Europe.

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File URL: http://www2.almalaurea.it/universita/pubblicazioni/wp/pdf/wp17.pdf
File Function: First version, 2011
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium in its series Working Papers with number 17.

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Length: 32
Date of creation: Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:laa:wpaper:17

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Web page: http://www.almalaurea.it

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  1. Flanagan, Robert J., 1998. "Were communists good human capitalists? The case of the Czech Republic," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 295-312, September.
  2. Acemoglu, Daron & Autor, David, 2011. "Skills, Tasks and Technologies: Implications for Employment and Earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
  3. David Card & Jesse Rothstein, 2006. "Racial Segregation and the Black-White Test Score Gap," NBER Working Papers 12078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  5. Hanushek, Eric A. & Wößmann, Ludger, 2012. "Do better schools lead to more growth? Cognitive skills, economic outcomes, and causation," Munich Reprints in Economics 20400, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  6. Michael Gebel & Friedhelm Pfeiffer, 2007. "Educational Expansion and Its Heterogeneous Returns for Wage Workers," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 13, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  7. Flabbi, Luca & Paternostro, Stefano & Tiongson, Erwin R., 2008. "Returns to education in the economic transition: A systematic assessment using comparable data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 724-740, December.
  8. Campos, Nauro F & Jolliffe, Dean, 2007. "Earnings, Schooling and Economic Reform: Econometric Evidence from Hungary (1986-2004)," IZA Discussion Papers 2678, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Daniela Andren & John S. Earle & Dana Sapatoru, . "The Wage Effects of Schooling under Socialism and in Transition: Evidence from Romania, 1950-2000," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles jse20051, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  10. Lamo, Ana & Messina, Julián & Wasmer, Etienne, 2011. "Are specific skills an obstacle to labor market adjustment?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 240-256, April.
  11. Orazem, Peter F. & Vodopivec, Milan, 1997. "Value of human capital in transition to market: Evidence from Slovenia," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 893-903, April.
  12. Francis Green & Yu Zhu, 2008. "Overqualification, Job Dissatisfaction, and Increasing Dispersion in the Returns to Graduate Education," Studies in Economics 0803, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  13. Card, David, 1999. "The causal effect of education on earnings," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 30, pages 1801-1863 Elsevier.
  14. Jurajda, Stepan, 2003. "Gender wage gap and segregation in enterprises and the public sector in late transition countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 199-222, June.
  15. Belton M. Fleisher & Klara Sabirianova Peter & Xiaojun Wang, 2004. "Returns to Skills and the Speed of Reforms: Evidence from Central and Eastern Europe, China, and Russia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-703, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
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Cited by:
  1. Fuchs-Schündeln, Nicola & Masella, Paolo, 2013. "Long-Lasting Effects of Socialist Education," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79865, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  2. Elsner, Benjamin, 2011. "Emigration and Wages: The EU Enlargement Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 6111, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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