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Bananas, Oil, and Development: Examining the Resource Curse and Its Transmission Channels by Resource Type

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  • Jann Lay
  • Toman Omar Mahmoud

Abstract

This paper examines the resource curse and its transmission channels by resource type. We review and synthesize existing theories of the transmission channels of the curse. This synthesis suggests that (1) relating the transmission channels to the characteristics of different types of resources, and (2) considering how other country characteristics, such as institutional quality and policy outcomes, affect the impact of natural resource wealth on development, would improve our understanding of the functioning of the curse. We then assess these two aspects empirically and find different transmission channels to be relevant for different types of resources. Furthermore, we illustrate the interaction between other country characteristics and the curse.

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File URL: http://www.ifw-members.ifw-kiel.de/publications/bananas-oil-and-development-examining-the-resource-curse-and-its-transmission-channels-by-resource-type/kap1218.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its series Kiel Working Papers with number 1218.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kie:kieliw:1218

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Keywords: O11; O13; C21;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Rabah Arezki & Frederick van der Ploeg, 2011. "Do Natural Resources Depress Income Per Capita?," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 504-521, 08.
  2. Rabah Arezki & Frederick van der Ploeg, 2008. "Can The Natural Resource Curse Be Turned Into A Blessing? The Role of Trade Policies and Institutions," OxCarre Working Papers 001, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
  3. van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2006. "Challenges and Opportunities for Resource Rich Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 5688, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Vittorio Daniele, 2011. "Natural Resources and the 'Quality' of Economic Development," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(4), pages 545-573.
  5. Matthias Basedau, 2005. "Context Matters – Rethinking the Resource Curse in Sub-Saharan Africa," GIGA Working Paper Series 01, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  6. Matthias Basedau, 2005. "Context Matters – Rethinking the Resource Curse in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic History 0508002, EconWPA.

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