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The Effect of Fiscal Policy Shocks on the Flow of Funds

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  • Andrew Bossie

Abstract

Abstract: This paper uses a selection of fiscal vector autoregression models to identify the effect of fiscal policy shocks on the private sector’s balance sheet using the Flow of Funds. As well, I examine the response of treasury interest rates, the Federal Funds rate and the assets of the Federal Reserve to gauge the response of monetary policy to fiscal policy shocks. I find that the Federal Reserve does not respond to fiscal policy shocks in any significant way. I also find that the business sector responds to fiscal policy shocks but not very strongly. The household sector responds more clearly. Fiscal policy shocks have an effect on household’s holdings of both short term liquid assets and long term illiquid assets. Spending shocks also have a clear effect on mortgage lending.

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File URL: ftp://ideas.repec.org/pub/RePEc/jmp/files/2013/pbo741AndrewBossie--FiscalPolicyandFlowofFunds.pdf
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Paper provided by Job Market Papers in its series 2013 Papers with number pbo741.

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Date of creation: 15 Nov 2013
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Handle: RePEc:jmp:jm2013:pbo741

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  1. Burton A. Abrams & James L. Butkiewicz, 2011. "The Political Business Cycle: New Evidence from the Nixon Tapes," Working Papers 11-05, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  2. Bai, Jushan & Lumsdaine, Robin L & Stock, James H, 1998. "Testing for and Dating Common Breaks in Multivariate Time Series," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(3), pages 395-432, July.
  3. Favero, Carlo A. & Giavazzi, Francesco, 2009. "How Large Are the Effects of Tax Changes?," CEPR Discussion Papers 7439, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Andrew Mountford & Harald Uhlig, 2005. "What are the Effects of Fiscal Policy Shocks?," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-039, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  5. Carlo Favero & Francesco Giavazzi, 2012. "Measuring Tax Multipliers: The Narrative Method in Fiscal VARs," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 69-94, May.
  6. Jushan Bai & Pierre Perron, 2003. "Computation and analysis of multiple structural change models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 1-22.
  7. Daniel Riera-Crichton & Carlos A. Vegh & Guillermo Vuletin, 2012. "Tax Multipliers: Pitfalls in Measurement and Identification," NBER Working Papers 18497, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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