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Can the United States Expand Apprenticeship? Lessons from Experience

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  • Lerman, Robert I.

    ()
    (Urban Institute)

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    Abstract

    Can expanded apprenticeship reduce the concerns about the U.S. workforce? The U.S. labor market faces a rise in unemployment rates, sharp declines in the employed share of U.S. adults, extremely high youth unemployment, high wage inequality, and low or stagnant wage growth for workers below the BA degree. Currently, the primary solution advanced by policymakers – helping more people go to college – is both expensive and of limited effectiveness. Unfortunately, the U.S. policy debate is rarely informed by international experience with systems that prepare young people for careers, especially for technical occupations. Few if any cite the experience in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria in achieving high levels of income and relatively low levels of earnings inequality without a college graduation rate above the OECD average. Americans know little about the success of apprenticeship systems abroad nor are they or their political leaders aware of the growth of apprenticeship programs in Australia, England, and other advanced economies. Given the potential for expanded apprenticeship to deal effectively with skill mismatches, wage inequality, declines in manufacturing employment, and high youth unemployment, why has the U.S. failed to mount a significant apprenticeship initiative? A number of reports, including the Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation (OECD 2009) review of youth employment, have recommended expanding apprenticeship training yet failed to stimulate significant action. Apprenticeship training would seem consistent with American values of pragmatism and extensive use of the market and public-private collaborations, and a limited role for government. The paper begins by describing the existing U.S. apprenticeship system, how the system evolved, and measures of its effectiveness. The next sections examine the multiple barriers to expanding apprenticeship in the U.S., highlighting both ideological and practical obstacles. The final section describes how best to take advantage of the opportunities for expansion.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Policy Papers with number 46.

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    Length: 36 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:iza:izapps:pp46

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    Keywords: apprenticeship; skills; training;

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    1. Morris M. Kleiner & Alan B. Krueger, 2009. "Analyzing the Extent and Influence of Occupational Licensing on the Labor Market," Working Papers 1165, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    2. Gueorgui Kambourov & Iourii Manovskii, 2009. "Occupational Specificity Of Human Capital," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(1), pages 63-115, 02.
    3. Sullivan, Paul, 2006. "Empirical Evidence on Occupation and Industry Specific Human Capital," MPRA Paper 863, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Wojciech Kopczuk & Emmanuel Saez & Jae Song, 2010. "Earnings Inequality and Mobility in the United States: Evidence from Social Security Data since 1937," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 125(1), pages 91-128, February.
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Is the US ready for apprenticeship?
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-11-19 15:33:00
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    Cited by:
    1. Cahuc, Pierre & Carcillo, Stéphane & Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2013. "Youth Unemployment in Old Europe: The Polar Cases of France and Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 7490, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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