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Job Mobility in Britain: Are the Scots Different? Evidence from the BHPS

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  • Heitmueller, Axel

    ()
    (Cabinet Office, UK)

Abstract

The Scottish extension-sample of the British Household Panel Study (BHPS) is used to shed light on differences in job mobility patterns in England and Scotland for both men and women. Based on probit estimates of the overall mobility rate, a decomposition is applied to distinguish between explained and unexplained differences. Furthermore, exploiting data on the number of job changes, a zero inflated Poisson model is estimated to provide information on possible differences in the expected number of job changes. Overall, there is evidence that suggests significant differences in mobility patterns south and north of the Borders; however, these are confined to men. Yet, whether this suffices to justify a heterogeneous labour market policy for the two countries remains to be seen.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 773.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: May 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Scottish Journal of Political Economy, 2004, 51(3), 329-358
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp773

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Keywords: zero inflated Poisson model; probit decomposition; job mobility;

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  1. Harper, Barry, 1995. "Male Occupational Mobility in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 57(3), pages 349-69, August.
  2. Vuong, Quang H, 1989. "Likelihood Ratio Tests for Model Selection and Non-nested Hypotheses," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 307-33, March.
  3. Jones, David R & Makepeace, Gerald H, 1996. "Equal Worth, Equal Opportunities: Pay and Promotion in an Internal Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(435), pages 401-09, March.
  4. Gary S. Becker, 1962. "Investment in Human Capital: A Theoretical Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 9.
  5. Robert E. Hall, 1984. "The Importance of Lifetime Jobs in the U.S. Economy," NBER Working Papers 0560, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Cramer, J. S. & Ridder, G., 1991. "Pooling states in the multinomial logit model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 47(2-3), pages 267-272, February.
  7. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  8. Topel, Robert H & Ward, Michael P, 1992. "Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 439-79, May.
  9. Even, William E. & Macpherson, David A., 1990. "Plant size and the decline of unionism," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 393-398, April.
  10. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Carlos Garcia-Serrano, 1999. "Job tenure and job mobility in Britain," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(1), pages 43-70, October.
  11. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-90, October.
  12. Dolton, Peter J & Kidd, Michael P, 1998. "Job Changes, Occupational Mobility and Human Capital Acquisition: An Empirical Analysis," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(4), pages 265-95, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Kevin E. Staub & Rainer Winkelmann, 2009. "Consistent estimation of zero-inflated count models," SOI - Working Papers 0908, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich, revised Aug 2011.
  2. Wu, Meng-Wen & Shen, Chung-Hua, 2013. "Corporate social responsibility in the banking industry: Motives and financial performance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 3529-3547.
  3. Nestmann, Thorsten, 2005. "German bank lending to industrial and non-industrial countries: driven by fundamentals or different treatment?," Discussion Paper Series 2: Banking and Financial Studies 2005,08, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.

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