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The Effects of "Girl-Friendly" Schools: Evidence from the BRIGHT School Construction Program in Burkina Faso

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Author Info

  • Kazianga, Harounan

    ()
    (Oklahoma State University)

  • Levy, Dan

    ()
    (Harvard Kennedy School)

  • Linden, Leigh L.

    ()
    (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Sloan, Matt

    (Mathematica Policy Research)

Abstract

We evaluate the causal effects of a program that constructed high quality "girl-friendly" primary schools in Burkina Faso, using a regression discontinuity design 2.5 years after the program started. We find that the program increased enrollment of all children between the ages of 5 and 12 by 20 percentage points and increased their test scores by 0.45 standard deviations. The change in test scores for those children caused to attend school by the program is 2.2 standard deviations. We also find that the program was particularly effective for girls, increasing their enrollment rate by 5 percentage points more than boys', although this did not translate into a differential effect on test scores. Disentangling the effects of school access from the unique characteristics of the new schools, we find that the unique characteristics were responsible for a 13 percentage point increase in enrollment and 0.35 standard deviations in test scores, while simply providing a school increased enrollment by 26.5 percentage points and test scores by 0.323 standard deviations. The unique characteristics of the school account for the entire difference in the treatment effect by gender.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6574.

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Length: 78 pages
Date of creation: May 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2013, 5(3), 41-62
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6574

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Keywords: gender inequality; education; Africa; enrollment;

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References

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  1. Paul Glewwe & Michael Kremer & Sylvie Moulin & Eric Zitzewitz, 2004. "Retrospective vs. prospective analyses of school inputs: The case of flip charts in kenya," Natural Field Experiments 00256, The Field Experiments Website.
  2. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Erik Bloom & Elizabeth King & Michael Kremer, 2002. "Vouchers for Private Schooling in Colombia: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1535-1558, December.
  3. repec:feb:natura:0004 is not listed on IDEAS
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Cited by:
  1. Karthik Muralidharan & Nishith Prakash, 2013. "Cycling to School: Increasing Secondary School Enrollment for Girls in India," NBER Working Papers 19305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. de Hoop, Jacobus & Rosati, Furio C., 2012. "Does Promoting School Attendance Reduce Child Labour? Evidence from Burkina Faso's BRIGHT Project," IZA Discussion Papers 6601, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Andy Dickerson & Steven McIntosh & Christine Valente, . "Do The Maths: An Analysis Of The Gender Gap In Mathematics In AfricaAbstract: This paper uses microdata for 19 African countries to examine the gender difference in maths test scores amongst primary s," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 13/300, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  4. Maiga, Eugenie W.H., 2014. "Does foreign aid in education foster gender equality in developing countries?," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  5. de Hoop, Jacobus & Rosati, Furio C., 2014. "Does promoting school attendance reduce child labor? Evidence from Burkina Faso's BRIGHT project," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 78-96.
  6. Dickerson, Andy & McIntosh, Steven & Valente, Christine, 2013. "Do the Maths: An Analysis of the Gender Gap in Mathematics in Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 7174, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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