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Health Behavior and Accident Risk: Obesity Is Associated with the Future Risk of Heavy Truck Crashes among Newly Recruited Commercial Drivers

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Author Info

  • Anderson, Jon E.

    ()
    (University of Minnesota, Morris)

  • Govada, Manjari

    (University of Minnesota, Morris)

  • Steffen, Tricia K.

    (University of Minnesota, Morris)

  • Thorne, Chris P.

    (University of Minnesota, Morris)

  • Varvarigou, Vasileia

    ()
    (Harvard School of Public Health)

  • Kales, Stefanos N.

    ()
    (Harvard School of Public Health)

  • Burks, Stephen V.

    ()
    (University of Minnesota, Morris)

Abstract

This study estimates the dose-response relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and crash risk in commercial motor vehicle operators. Intake data was collected on 744 new truck drivers who were training for their commercial driver's licenses at a school operated by the cooperating trucking firm during the first two-week phase of instruction. Drivers were then followed prospectively on the job using the firm's operational data for two years, or until employment separation, whichever came first. Multivariate Poisson regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the relationship between crash risk and BMI, controlling for exposure using miles driven, trip segments, and job type. Results from the Poisson regression indicated that the risk ratio (RR) for all crashes was significantly higher for drivers in the obesity Class II and Class III categories: RR= 1.6, confidence interval 1.2-2.1 and RR= 1.49, confidence interval 1.12-1.99, respectively. Similarly, the multivariate Cox Proportional Hazard model results showed that crash risk was significantly higher for obesity class II (BMI 35 to 40; RR = 1.35, P =0.06) when compared to normal BMI (BMI 18.5 to

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6408.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6408

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Related research

Keywords: obesity; traffic accidents; body mass index; heavy truck; commercial motor vehicle; Poisson regression; Cox proportional hazard; truckload; health behavior;

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  1. Stephen V. Burks & Jeffrey Carpenter & Lorenz Götte & Kristen Monaco & Kay Porter & Aldo Rustichini, 2008. "Using Behavioral Economic Field Experiments at a Firm: The Context and Design of the Truckers and Turnover Project," NBER Chapters, in: The Analysis of Firms and Employees: Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches, pages 45-106 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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