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Labor Productivity and Vocational Training: Evidence from Europe

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Author Info

  • Sala, Hector

    ()
    (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

  • Silva, José I.

    ()
    (University of Kent)

Abstract

In this paper we show that vocational training is an important determinant of productivity growth. We construct a multi-country, multi-sectoral dataset, and quantify empirically to what extent vocational training has contributed to increase the growth rate of labor productivity in Europe between 1999 and 2005. We find that one extra hour of training per employee accelerates the rate of productivity growth by around 0.55 percentage points.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6171.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Journal of Productivity Analysis, 2013, 40 (1), 31-41
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6171

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Keywords: continuous vocational training; labor productivity growth;

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References

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  1. Jakob Madsen, 2008. "Semi-endogenous versus Schumpeterian growth models: testing the knowledge production function using international data," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 1-26, March.
  2. Lorraine Dearden & Howard Reed & John Van Reenen, 2005. "The Impact of Training on Productivity and Wages: Evidence from British Panel Data," CEP Discussion Papers dp0674, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Mário Centeno & Márcio Corrêa, 2005. "Job Matching, Technological Progress And Worker-Provided On-The-Job Training," Anais do XXXIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 33th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 171, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
  4. Cecilia ALBERT & Carlos GARCÍA-SERRANO & Virginia HERNANZ, 2010. "On-the-job training in Europe: Determinants and wage returns," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 149(3), pages 315-341, 09.
  5. Peter J. Klenow & Mark Bils, 2000. "Does Schooling Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1160-1183, December.
  6. Easterly, William & King, Robert G & Levine, Ross & Rebelo, Sérgio, 1994. "Policy, Technology Adoption and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 957, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Caponi, Vincenzo & Kayahan, Cevat Burc & Plesca, Miana, 2009. "The Impact of Aggregate and Sectoral Fluctuations on Training Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 4042, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Daron Acemoglu & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2001. "Productivity Differences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(2), pages 563-606, May.
  9. Jonathan Temple, 2006. "Aggregate Production Functions and Growth Economics," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 301-317.
  10. Grund, Christian & Martin, Johannes, 2010. "Determinants of Further Training: Evidence for Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 5315, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Sousounis, Panos & Bladen-Hovell, Robin, 2010. "Persistence in the determination of work-related training participation: Evidence from the BHPS, 1991-1997," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1005-1015, December.
  12. Kemeny, Thomas, 2010. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Drive Technological Upgrading?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 1543-1554, November.
  13. Robert J. Barro, 1989. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," NBER Working Papers 3120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1997. "I Just Ran Two Million Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 178-83, May.
  15. Sergio Scicchitano, 2010. "Complementarity between heterogeneous human capital and R&D: can job-training avoid low development traps?," Empirica, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 361-380, November.
  16. Madsen, Jakob B., 2010. "The anatomy of growth in the OECD since 1870," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(6), pages 753-767, September.
  17. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Dario Simon Judzik & Hector Sala Lorda, 2014. "The determinants of capital intensity in Japan and the U.S," Working Papers wpdea1404, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.

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