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The Role of Mothers and Fathers in Providing Skills: Evidence from Parental Deaths

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Author Info

  • Adda, Jérôme

    ()
    (European University Institute)

  • Björklund, Anders

    ()
    (SOFI, Stockholm University)

  • Holmlund, Helena

    ()
    (CEP, London School of Economics)

Abstract

This paper evaluates the long-term consequences of parental death on children’s cognitive and noncognitive skills, as well as on labor market outcomes. We exploit a large administrative data set covering many Swedish cohorts. We develop new estimation methods to tackle the potential endogeneity of death at an early age, based on the idea that the amount of endogeneity is constant or decreasing during childhood. Our method also allows us to identify a set of death causes that are conditionally exogenous. We find that the loss of either a father or a mother on boys' earnings is no higher than 6-7 percent and slightly lower for girls. Our examination of the impact on cognitive skills (IQ and educational attainment) and on noncognitive skills (emotional stability, social skills) shows rather small effects on each type of skill. We find that both mothers and fathers are important, but mothers are somewhat more important for cognitive skills and fathers for noncognitive ones.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5425.

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Length: 56 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5425

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Related research

Keywords: family background; cognitive and noncognitive skills; parental death;

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References

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  1. Miles Corak, . "Death and Divorce: The Long Term Consequences of Parental Loss on Adolescents," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 39, McMaster University.
  2. James J. Heckman & Jora Stixrud & Sergio Urzua, 2006. "The Effects of Cognitive and Noncognitive Abilities on Labor Market Outcomes and Social Behavior," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(3), pages 411-482, July.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Massimiliano Bratti & Mariapia Mendola, 2011. "Parental Health and Child Schooling," Development Working Papers 318, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 17 Oct 2011.
  2. Gould, Eric D & Simhon, Avi, 2011. "Does Quality Time Produce Quality Children? Evidence on the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital using Parental Deaths," CEPR Discussion Papers 8258, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Timo Hener & Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2012. "Political Socialization in Flux? Linking Family Non-Intactness during Childhood to Adult Civic Engagement," CESifo Working Paper Series 3918, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Westermaier, Franz & Morefield, Brant & Mühlenweg, Andrea M., 2013. "Impacts of parental health shocks on children's non-cognitive skills," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-032, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  5. Massimiliano Bratti & Mendola, M., 2013. "GINI DP 63: Parental Health and Child Schooling!," GINI Discussion Papers 63, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  6. Morefield, Brant & Mühlenweg, Andrea M. & Westermaier, Franz, 2011. "Impacts of parental health on children's development of personality traits and problem behavior: Evidence from parental health shocks," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-049, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

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