Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Migration, Remittances and Children’s Schooling in Haiti

Contents:

Author Info

  • Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina

    ()
    (San Diego State University)

  • Georges, Annie

    ()
    (National Center for Children and Families)

  • Pozo, Susan

    ()
    (Western Michigan University)

Abstract

In this paper, we focus on the use of remittances to school children remaining in migrant communities in Haiti. After addressing the endogeneity of remittance receipt, we find that remittances raise school attendance for all children in some communities regardless of whether they have household members abroad or not; however, in other communities, we only observe this effect among children living in households that do not experience any family out-migration. Our finding underscores the simultaneous and opposing impacts of household out-migration and remittance receipt on children’s schooling. While the receipt of remittances by the household lifts budget constraints and raises the children’s likelihood of being schooled, the disruptive effect of household out-migration imposes an economic burden on the remaining household members and reduces their likelihood of being schooled. As such, remittances ameliorate the negative disruptive effect of household out-migration on children’s schooling and, given the substantial costs of schooling in Haiti, contribute to the accumulation of human capital in the midst of extreme poverty.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp3657.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 3657.

as in new window
Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3657

Contact details of provider:
Postal: IZA, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
Phone: +49 228 3894 223
Fax: +49 228 3894 180
Web page: http://www.iza.org

Order Information:
Postal: IZA, Margard Ody, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
Email:

Related research

Keywords: education; remittances; migration; Haiti;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Paul Schultz, T., 2002. "Why Governments Should Invest More to Educate Girls," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 207-225, February.
  2. Alejandra Cox Edwards & Manuelita Ureta, 2003. "International Migration, Remittances, and Schooling: Evidence from El Salvador," NBER Working Papers 9766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Adams Jr., Richard H. & Cuecuecha, Alfredo, 2010. "Remittances, Household Expenditure and Investment in Guatemala," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(11), pages 1626-1641, November.
  4. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
  5. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
  6. Woodruff, Christopher & Zenteno, Rene, 2007. "Migration networks and microenterprises in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 509-528, March.
  7. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2006. "Remittance Receipt and Business Ownership in the Dominican Republic," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(7), pages 939-956, 07.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Michael Clemens & Erwin Tiongson, 2012. "Split Decisions: Family finance when a policy discontinuity allocates overseas work," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1234, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Kathryn Anderson & Antje Kroeger, 2011. "Remittances and Children's Capabilities: New Evidence from Kyrgyzstan, 2005-2008," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 430, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  3. Kroeger, Antje & Anderson, Kathryn H., 2012. "Remittances and Children's Capabilities: New Evidence from Kyrgyzstan, 2005-2008," IZA Discussion Papers 6293, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Partha Deb & Papa Seck, 2009. "Internal Migration, Selection Bias and Human Development: Evidence from Indonesia and Mexico," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2009-31, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), revised Jul 2009.
  5. Antman, Francisca M., 2012. "The Impact of Migration on Family Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 6374, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Sylvie Démurger & Shi Li, 2012. "Migration, Remittances and Rural Employment Patterns: Evidence from China," Post-Print halshs-00744438, HAL.
  7. Benedictis, Geovanna & Calfat, Germán & Jara, Karina, 2010. "Assessing the Impact of Remittances on Child Education in Ecuador: The role of educational supply constraints," IOB Working Papers 2010.06, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy and Management (IOB).
  8. Gönsch, Iris, 2010. "Determinants of primary school enrollment in Haiti and the Dominican Republic," Discussion Papers 54, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
  9. Antje Kröger & Kathryn Anderson, 2011. "Remittances and Children's Capabilities: New Evidence from Kyrgyzstan, 2005-2008," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1170, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  10. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny & Jesús Cañas & Roberto Coronado, 2010. "Do remittances boost economic development? Evidence from Mexican states," Working Papers 1007, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  11. Bredl, Sebastian, 2009. "Migration, remittances and educational outcomes: The case of Haiti," Discussion Papers 44, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
  12. Gindling, T. H. & Poggio, Sara Z., 2010. "The Effect of Family Separation and Reunification on the Educational Success of Immigrant Children in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 4887, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00744438 is not listed on IDEAS

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3657. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.