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Is Part-time Employment Here To Stay? Evidence from the Dutch Labour Force Survey 1992–2005

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Author Info

  • Bosch, Nicole

    ()
    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Deelen, Anja

    ()
    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Euwals, Rob

    ()
    (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

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    Abstract

    To balance work and family responsibilities, the Netherlands have chosen a unique model that combines a high female employment rate with a high part-time employment rate. The model is likely to be the result of (societal) preferences as the removal of institutional barriers, like lower marginal tax rates for partners and better childcare facilities, has not led to more working hours. It is, however, an open question whether the model is here to stay or whether younger generations of women will choose full-time jobs in the near future. We investigate the development of working hours over successive generations of women using the Dutch Labour Force Survey 1992-2005. We find evidence of an increasing propensity to work part-time over the successive generations, and a decreasing propensity to work full-time for the generations born after the early 1950s. Our results are in line with results of studies on social norms and attitudes as they find a similar pattern over the successive generations. It therefore seems likely that without changes in (societal) preferences the part-time employment model is indeed here to stay for some more time.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 3367.

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    Length: 30 pages
    Date of creation: Feb 2008
    Date of revision:
    Publication status: published in: Labour, 2010, 24(1), 35-54
    Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3367

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    Related research

    Keywords: female labour supply; working hours;

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    References

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    1. Michiel Evers & Ruud de Mooij & Daniel van Vuuren, 2005. "What explains the variation in estimates of labour supply elasticities?," CPB Discussion Paper 51, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    2. Manning, Alan & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2006. "The Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 2419, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Soest, A.H.O. van & Das, J.W.M., 2000. "Family labor supply and proposed tax reforms in the Netherlands," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-121735, Tilburg University.
    4. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
    5. Florence Jaumotte, 2003. "Female Labour Force Participation: Past Trends and Main Determinants in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 376, OECD Publishing.
    6. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 2002. "The Power of the Pill: Oral Contraceptives and Women's Career and Marriage Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(4), pages 730-770, August.
    7. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & Mourre, Gilles & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie, 2008. "Why do Europeans work part-time? A cross-country panel analysis," Working Paper Series 0872, European Central Bank.
    8. Blundell, Richard, 2006. "Earned income tax credit policies: Impact and optimality: The Adam Smith Lecture, 2005," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 423-443, August.
    9. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2008. "Feature: The Price of Reconciliation: Part-Time Work, Families and Women's Satisfaction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages F1-F7, 02.
    10. Rob Euwals, 2008. "Evaluation of a tax reform: a model with measurement error," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(9), pages 697-700.
    11. Blank, Rebecca M, 1989. "The Role of Part-Time Work in Women's Labor Market Choices over Time," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 295-99, May.
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