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The Political Economy of Social Exclusion with Implications for Immigration Policy

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  • Gradstein, Mark

    ()
    (Ben Gurion University)

  • Schiff, Maurice

    ()
    (World Bank)

Abstract

Minorities, such as ethnic and immigration groups, have often been subject to exclusion through labor market discrimination, residential and employment segregation policies, business ownership regulations, restrictions on political participation, access to public services and more. This paper studies the dynamics of minority exclusion. From the viewpoint of the dominant majority, the exclusion decision balances the motive to redistribute income in its favor and the interest in avoiding potential civic unrest or even violent confrontation with the minority by allowing inclusion of some of its members. The analysis also has implications for immigration policies which have to take this group dynamics into account.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1087.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2004
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Journal of Population Economics, 2006, 19 (2), 327-344
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1087

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Keywords: immigration policy; dynamics; social exclusion;

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References

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  5. Easterly, William, 2000. "the middle class consensus and economic development," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 2346, The World Bank.
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  7. Easterly, W & Levine, R, 1996. "Africa's Growth Tragedy : Policies and Ethnic Divisions," Papers, Harvard - Institute for International Development 536, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
  8. Edward L. Glaeser & Andrei Shleifer, 2002. "The Curley Effect," NBER Working Papers 8942, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Francesco Caselli, 2007. "On the theory of ethnic conflict," 2007 Meeting Papers, Society for Economic Dynamics 162, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  10. Easterly, William, 2001. "Can Institutions Resolve Ethnic Conflict?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(4), pages 687-706, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Epstein, Gil S. & Mealem, Yosef, 2010. "Interactions between Local and Migrant Workers at the Workplace," IZA Discussion Papers 5051, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Sylvain Dessy & Flaubert Mbiekop, 2006. "Democratic Voting and Social Exclusion," Cahiers de recherche, CIRPEE 0618, CIRPEE.
  3. Graziella Bertocchi & Chiara Strozzi, 2005. "Citizenship Laws and International Migration in Historical Perspective," Working Papers, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei 2005.71, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  4. Heather Antecol & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2008. "The Effect of Community-Level Socio-Economic Conditions on Threatening Racial Encounters," CEPR Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University 589, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  5. Gil S. Epstein & Ira N Gang, 2006. "Migrants, Ethnicity and Strategic Assimilation," Departmental Working Papers, Rutgers University, Department of Economics 200630, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  6. Gil Epstein, 2007. "Extremism within the family," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 707-715, July.
  7. Graziella Bertocchi & Chiara Strozzi, 2008. "International Migration and the Role of Institutions," Center for Economic Research (RECent), University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics 012, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics.
  8. Graziella Bertocchi & Chiara Strozzi, 2006. "The Evolution of Citizenship: Economic and Institutional Determinants," Development Working Papers, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano 211, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  9. Epstein, Gil S. & Gang, Ira N., 2008. "Ethnicity, Assimilation and Harassment in the Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 3591, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Bertocchi, Graziella & Strozzi, Chiara, 2006. "The Age of Mass Migration: Economic and Institutional Determinants," IZA Discussion Papers 2499, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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