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Prices and Health: Identifying the Effects of Nutrition, Exercise, and Medication Choices on Blood Pressure

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  • Chen, S.
  • Shogren, Jason F.
  • Orazem, Peter

Abstract

Biomedical studies suggest that a person?s behavior matters to health, but these studies usually treat human choice as exogenous. This study shows that individual choices on nutrient intake, exercise and use of medication are influenced by exogenous food prices, wages and nonlabor income. Using these exogenous variables as instruments for endogenous behavior makes a big difference in the estimated impact of nutrient intake, exercise and medication on blood pressure. For example, application of instrumental variables methods changes the impact of sodium on blood pressure from positive to negative and significant.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 5059.

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Date of creation: 01 Nov 2002
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Publication status: Published in American Journal of Agricultural Economics, November 2002, vol. 84, pp. 990-1002
Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:5059

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Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
Phone: +1 515.294.6741
Fax: +1 515.294.0221
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Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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References

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  1. Behrman, Jere R. & Deolalikar, Anil B., 1988. "Health and nutrition," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 14, pages 631-711 Elsevier.
  2. Kuo S. Huang, 1996. "Nutrient Elasticities in a Complete Food Demand System," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(1), pages 21-29.
  3. Fogel, Robert W., 1993. "Economic Growth, Population Theory, and Physiology: The Bearing of Long-Term Processes on the Making of Economic Policy," Nobel Prize in Economics documents 1993-1, Nobel Prize Committee.
  4. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
  5. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  6. J. A. Hausman, 1976. "Specification Tests in Econometrics," Working papers 185, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  7. Behrman, Jere R. & Wolfe, Barbara L., 1987. "How does mother's schooling affect family health, nutrition, medical care usage, and household sanitation?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 185-204.
  8. Geraci, Vincent J., 1976. "Identification of simultaneous equation models with measurement error," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 263-283, August.
  9. Jayachandran N. Variyam & James Blaylock & Biing-Hwan Lin & Katherine Ralston & David Smallwood, 1999. "Mother's Nutrition Knowledge and Children's Dietary Intakes," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(2), pages 373-384.
  10. Kenkel, D.S., 1988. "Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, And Schooling," Papers 10-88-3, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  11. Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Pitt, Mark M., 1984. "Agricultural Prices, Food Consumption and the Health and Productivity of Farmers," Bulletins 7471, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
  12. Strauss, John, 1986. "Does Better Nutrition Raise Farm Productivity?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(2), pages 297-320, April.
  13. Shogren, Jason F. & Crocker, Thomas D., 1999. "Risk and Its Consequences," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 44-51, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Mazzocchi, Mario & Traill, W. Bruce, 2008. "A structural model of wealth, obesity and health in the UK," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43968, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Horan, Richard D. & Shogren, Jason F. & Bulte, Erwin H., 2011. "Joint determination of biological encephalization, economic specialization," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 426-439, May.
  3. Schroeter, Christiane & Lusk, Jayson L., 2007. "The Impact Of Economic Factors On Consumer Health," 2007 Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland, Oregon 7364, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
  4. Mark Agee & Thomas Crocker, 2007. "Children’s health benefits of reducing environmental tobacco smoke exposure: evidence from parents who smoke," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 217-237, April.
  5. Fabrice Etile, 2013. "L'économie des consommations à risques au miroir des politiques de santé publique," Working Papers 221515, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France.
  6. Staudigel, Matthias, 2011. "How (much) do food prices contribute to obesity in Russia?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 133-147, March.
  7. Staudigel, Matthias, 2012. "On The Application Of Household Production Theory To Health And Nutrition," 52nd Annual Conference, Stuttgart, Germany, September 26-28, 2012 137389, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
  8. Lutter, Randall & Tucker, Katherine, 2003. "Unacknowledged Health Benefits Of Genetically Modified Food - Salmon And Heart Disease Deaths," Working paper 355, Regulation2point0.
  9. Orazem, Peter & Gunnarsson, Victoria, 2004. "Child Labour, School Attendance and Performance: A Review," Staff General Research Papers 11177, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.

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