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When It Comes to Demand Response, is FERC Its Own Worst Enemy?

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Author Info

  • Bushnell, James
  • Hobbs, Benjamin
  • Wolak, Frank

Abstract

The traditional approach to demand response of paying for a customer's electricity consumption reductions relative to an administratively set baseline is currently being advocated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) as a way to foster the participation of final consumers in formal wholesale markets. Although these efforts may lead to greater participation of final consumers in traditional demand response programs, they are likely to work against the ultimate goal of increasing the benefits that electricity consumers realize from formal wholesale electricity markets, because traditional demand response programs are likely to provide a less reliable product than generation resources. The moral hazard and adverse selection problems that reduce the reliability of the product provided by traditional demand response resources can be addressed by treating consumers and producers of electricity symmetrically in the wholesale market. Several suggestions are made for how this would be accomplished in both the energy and ancillary services markets. A specific application of this general approach to the California wholesale electricity market is also provided.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 13141.

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Date of creation: 01 Oct 2009
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Publication status: Published in Electricity Journal, October 2009, vol. 22 no. 8, pp. 9-18
Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:13141

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Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
Phone: +1 515.294.6741
Fax: +1 515.294.0221
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Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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Cited by:
  1. Masahiko Aoki & Geoffrey Rothwell, 2011. "Organizations under Large Uncertainty: An Analysis of the Fukushima Catastrophe," Discussion Papers 11-001, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  2. Hung-po Chao, 2012. "Competitive electricity markets with consumer subscription service in a smart grid," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 155-180, February.
  3. Aoki, Masahiko & Rothwell, Geoffrey, 2011. "Coordination Under Uncertain Conditions: An Analysis of the Fukushima Catastrophe," ADBI Working Papers 316, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  4. Hung-po Chao & Mario DePillis, 2013. "Incentive effects of paying demand response in wholesale electricity markets," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 265-283, June.
  5. Hung-po Chao, 2011. "Demand response in wholesale electricity markets: the choice of customer baseline," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 68-88, February.

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