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Hysteresis in an Evolutionary Labor Market with Adaptive Search

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  • Tesfatsion, Leigh

Abstract

This study undertakes a systematic experimental investigation of hysteresis (path dependency) in an agent-based computational labor market framework. It is shown that capacity asymmetries between work suppliers and employers can result in two distinct hysteresis effects, network and behavioral, when work suppliers and employers interact strategically and evolve their worksite behaviors over time. These hysteresis effects result in persistent heterogeneity in earnings and employment histories across agents who have no observable structural differences. At a more global level, these hysteresis effects are shown to result in a one-to-many mapping between treatment factors and experimental outcomes. These hysteresis effects may help to explain why excess earnings heterogeneity is commonly observed in real-world labor markets. Related work can be accessed at: http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/tnghome.htm

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File URL: http://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/evlab.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 10035.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2002
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Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:10035

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Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
Phone: +1 515.294.6741
Fax: +1 515.294.0221
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Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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Related research

Keywords: Labor markets; Agent-based test bed; path dependence (hysteresis); network formation; strategy evolution;

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References

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  1. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1998. "Preferential Partner Selection in Evolutionary Labor Markets: A Study in Agent-Based Computational Economics," Staff General Research Papers 2048, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  2. Olivier J. Blanchard & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "Hysteresis And The European Unemployment Problem," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1986, Volume 1, pages 15-90 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. David MCFADZEAN & Leigh TESFATSION, 1996. "A C++ Platform For The Evolution Of Trade Networks," Economic Report 39, Iowa State University Department of Economics.
  4. Diamond, Peter A, 1982. "Aggregate Demand Management in Search Equilibrium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(5), pages 881-94, October.
  5. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2002. "Agent-Based Computational Economics," Computational Economics 0203001, EconWPA, revised 15 Aug 2002.
  6. Piscitelli, Laura, et al, 2000. "A Test for Strong Hysteresis," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 15(1-2), pages 59-78, April.
  7. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1997. "A Trade Network Game with Endogenous Partner Selection," Staff General Research Papers 1680, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  8. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David N. Margolis, 1994. "High-Wage Workers and High-Wage Firms," CIRANO Working Papers 94s-23, CIRANO.
  9. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 1997. "How Economists Can Get Alife," Staff General Research Papers 1685, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Yang, J.-H. Steffi, 2009. "Social network influence and market instability," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3-4), pages 257-276, March.
  2. Pingle, Mark & Tesfatsion, Leigh, 2003. "Evolution of Worker-Employer Networks and Behaviors Under Alternative Non-Employment Benefits: An Agent-Based Computational Approach," Staff General Research Papers 10376, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Chen, Shu-Heng, 2012. "Varieties of agents in agent-based computational economics: A historical and an interdisciplinary perspective," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 1-25.
  4. Leigh Tesfatsion & Mark Pingle, 2003. "Evolution of Worker-Employer Networks and Behaviors Under Alternative Non-Employment Benefits: An Agent-Based Computational Study," Computing in Economics and Finance 2003 7, Society for Computational Economics.

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