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Trends in individual income growth: measurement methods and British evidence

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  • JENKINS Stephen P.
  • VAN KERM Philippe

Abstract

Assessments of whose income growth is the greatest and whose is the smallest are typically based on comparisons of income changes for income groups (e.g. rich versus poor) or income values (e.g. quantiles). However, income group and quantile composition changes over time because of income mobility. To summarize patterns of income growth while also tracking the fortunes of the same individuals, a longitudinal perspective is required. For this case, we develop dominance conditions and summary indices for comparisons of distributions of individual income growth, together with associated methods of estimation and inference. Using these methods and data from the British Household Panel Survey, we study individual income growth for periods between 1991 and 2005. We show that income growth was signi?cantly more pro-poor in the early years of the Labour government than in earlier Conservative years.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CEPS/INSTEAD in its series CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series with number 2011-21.

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Length: 60 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:irs:cepswp:2011-21

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Keywords: individual income growth; pro-poor growth; progressive income growth; income mobility; mobility profile; British Household Panel Survey;

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References

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  1. Jenkins, Stephen P, 1997. "Trends in Real Income in Britain: A Microeconomic Analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 483-500.
  2. Michael Grimm, 2007. "Removing the anonymity axiom in assessing pro-poor growth," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 179-197, August.
  3. Stephen P. Jenkins & Philippe VanKerm, 2003. "Trends in Income Inequality, Pro-Poor Income Growth and Income Mobility," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 377, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Fields, Gary S. & Cichello, Paul & Freije, Samuel & Menéndez, Marta & Newhouse, David, 2003. "For Richer or for Poorer ? Evidence from Indonesia, South Africa, Spain, and Venezuela," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/1560, Paris Dauphine University.
  5. Wen-Hao Chen, 2009. "Cross-National Differences In Income Mobility: Evidence From Canada, The United States, Great Britain And Germany," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(1), pages 75-100, 03.
  6. Peter Gottschalk & Sheldon Danziger, 1999. "Income Mobility and Exits from Poverty of American Children, 1970-1992," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 430, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 15 Feb 2001.
  7. Van Kerm, Philippe, 2009. "Income mobility profiles," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 93-95, February.
  8. Lisa M. Dragoset & Gary S. Fields, 2006. "U.S. Earnings Mobility: Comparing Survey-Based and Administrative-Based Estimates," Working Papers 55, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  9. Jenkins, Stephen P., 2011. "Changing Fortunes: Income Mobility and Poverty Dynamics in Britain," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199226436.
  10. Jenkins, Stephen P., 2010. "The British Household Panel Survey and its income data," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-33, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  11. Fields, Gary S. & Leary, Jesse B. & Ok, Efe A., 2002. "Stochastic dominance in mobility analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 333-339, May.
  12. Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 2009. "The Rising Instability of U.S. Earnings," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(4), pages 3-24, Fall.
  13. Donaldson, David & Weymark, John A., 1980. "A single-parameter generalization of the Gini indices of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 67-86, February.
  14. Chakravarty, S. R., 1984. "Normative indices for measuring social mobility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 15(1-2), pages 175-180.
  15. B. Essama-Nssah & Peter J. Lambert, 2009. "Measuring Pro-Poorness: A Unifying Approach With New Results," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 752-778, 09.
  16. Daniele Checchi & Valentino Dardanoni, 2002. "Mobility comparisons: does using different measures matter?," Departmental Working Papers 2002-15, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  17. Fields, Gary S & Ok, Efe A, 1999. "Measuring Movement of Incomes," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 66(264), pages 455-71, November.
  18. François Bourguignon, 2010. "Non-anonymous Growth Incidence Curves, Income Mobility and Social Welfare Dominance : a theoretical framework with an application to the Global Economy," PSE Working Papers halshs-00966324, HAL.
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Trends in Individual Income Growth: Measurement Methods and British Evidence
    by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2011-02-28 21:11:19
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Cited by:
  1. Allanson, Paul & Petrie, Dennis, 2013. "Longitudinal methods to investigate the role of health determinants in the dynamics of income-related health inequality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 922-937.
  2. Jantti, Markus & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Income mobility," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  3. Paul Gregg & Rosanna Scutella & Claudia Vittori, 2012. "Earnings Mobility and Inequality: An Integrated Framework," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n26, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  4. Thomas Groll & Peter J. Lambert, 2011. "The pro-poorness, growth and inequality nexus: Some findings from a simulation study," Working Papers 214, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  5. Van Kerm, Philippe & Pi Alperin, Maria Noel, 2013. "Inequality, growth and mobility: The intertemporal distribution of income in European countries 2003–2007," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 931-939.
  6. KYZYMA Iryna, 2013. "Changes in the patterns of poverty duration in Germany, 1992-2009," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2013-06, CEPS/INSTEAD.
  7. V. Peragine & F. Palmisano & P. Brunori, 2011. "Economic growth and equality of opportunity," series 0037, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Metodi Matematici - Università di Bari, revised Oct 2011.

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