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Working Conditions and Health of European Older Workers

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  • Thierry Debrand

    ()
    (IRDES institut for research and information in health economics)

  • Pascale Lengagne

    ()
    (IRDES institut for research and information in health economics)

Abstract

Working conditions have greatly evolved in recent decades in developed countries. This evolution has been accompanied with the appearance of new forms of work organisation that may be sources of stress and health risk for older workers. As populations are ageing, these issues are particularly worrying in terms of the health, labour force participation and Social Security expenditure. This paper focuses on the links between quality of employment and the health of older workers, using the Share 2004 survey. Our research is based on two classical models: the Demand-Control model of Karasek and Theorell (1991) and the Effort-Reward Imbalance model of Siegrist (1996), which highlight three main dimensions: Demand that reflects perceived physical pressure and stress due to a heavy work load; Control that refers to decision latitude at work and the possibilities to develop new skills; and Reward that corresponds to the feeling of receiving a correct salary relatively to efforts made, of having prospects for personal progress and receiving deserved recognition. These models also take into account the notion of support in difficult situations at work and the feeling of job security. Our estimations show that the health status of older workers is related to these factors. Fairly low demand levels and a good level of reward are associated with a good health status, for both men and women. Control only influences the health status of women. Lastly, the results reveal the importance on health of a lack of support at work and the feeling of job insecurity; regardless of gender; these two factors are particularly related to the risk of depression. Thus health status and working conditions are important determinants of the labour force participation of older workers.

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File URL: http://www.irdes.fr/EspaceAnglais/Publications/WorkingPapers/DT8WorkingCondHealthEuropOldWorkers.pdf
File Function: First version, 2008
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by IRDES institut for research and information in health economics in its series Working Papers with number DT8.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2008
Date of revision: Feb 2008
Handle: RePEc:irh:wpaper:dt8

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Keywords: Working conditions; Health; Older Workers;

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Cited by:
  1. Zeynep Or & Chantal Cases & Melanie Lisac & Karsten Vrangbaek & Ulrika Winblad & Gwyn Bevan, 2009. "Are Health Problems Systemic? Politics of Access and Choice under Beveridge and Bismarck Systems," Working Papers DT27, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Sep 2009.
  2. Maria Racionero & Pierre Pestieau, 2012. "Harsh occupations, health status and social security," CEPR Discussion Papers 672, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  3. Jones, Melanie K. & Latreille, Paul L. & Sloane, Peter J. & Staneva, Anita V., 2011. "Work-Related Health in Europe: Are Older Workers More at Risk?," IZA Discussion Papers 6044, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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