Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Gender Inequalities in Allocating Time to Paid and Unpaid Work: Evidence from Bolivia

Contents:

Author Info

  • Marcelo Medeiros

    ()
    (International Poverty Centre)

  • Rafael Guerreiro Osório

    ()
    (International Poverty Centre)

  • Joana Costa

    ()
    (International Poverty Centre)

Abstract

This Working Paper analyzes paid and unpaid work-time inequalities among Bolivian urban adults using time use data from a 2001 household survey. We identified a gender-based division of labor characterized not so much by who does which type of work but by how much work of each type they do. There is a partial trade-off between paid and unpaid work, but such a substitution is only partial: women?s entry into the labor market tends to result in a double work shift of paid and unpaid work. We also find very high levels of within-group inequality in the distributions of paid and unpaid work-time for men and women, a sign that beyond the sexual division of labor, subgroup differentiation is also important. Using decompositions of the inequality in the distribution of total time spent at work, we show that gender is an important variable to explain how much paid and unpaid work is done by individuals, but not so important to explain why some people have a higher total workload than others.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.ipc-undp.org/pub/IPCWorkingPaper34.pdf
File Function: First version, 2007
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth in its series Working Papers with number 34.

as in new window
Length: 17
Date of creation: Apr 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published by UNDP - International Poverty Centre, April 2007, pages 1-17
Handle: RePEc:ipc:wpaper:34

Contact details of provider:
Email:
Web page: http://www.ipc-undp.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Gender; Inequalities; poor; Bolivia;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Carla Canelas & Silvia Salazar, 2014. "Gender and Ethnicity in Bolivia, Ecuador and Guatemala," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 14021, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  2. Carla Canelas & Silvia Salazar, 2014. "Gender and Ethnicity in Bolivia, Ecuador and Guatemala," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00973891, HAL.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ipc:wpaper:34. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Andre Lyra).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.