Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Trade liberalization, poverty and food security in India abstract: This paper attempts to assess the impact of trade

Contents:

Author Info

  • Manoj K. Panda

    ()
    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

  • A. Ganesh Kumar

    ()
    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper attempts to assess the impact of trade liberalization on growth, poverty, and food security in India with the help of a national level computable general equilibrium (CGE) model. It shows that GDP growth and income poverty reduction that might occur following trade liberalization need not necessarily result in an improvement in the food security / nutritional status of the poor. Evidence from simulations of (partial) trade reforms reflecting a possible Doha-like scenario show that the bottom 30 of the population in both rural and urban areas suffer a decline in calorie and protein intake, in contrast to the rest of the population, even as all households increase their intake of fats. Thus, the outcome on food security / status with regard to individual nutrients depends crucially on the movements in the relative prices of different commodities along with the change in income levels. These results show that trade policy analysis should consider indicators of food security in addition to overall growth and poverty traditionally considered in such studies.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.igidr.ac.in/pdf/publication/WP-2008-013.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India in its series Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers with number 2008-013.

    as in new window
    Length: 30 pages
    Date of creation: Jun 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2008-013

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Gen. A. K. Vaidya Marg, Goregaon (E), Mumbai 400065
    Phone: (022) 840 0919/20/21
    Fax: (022) 840 2752/2026
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.igidr.ac.in
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Doha negotiations; India trade policy; Poverty; Food security; CGE model;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. R. Radhakrishna & C. Ravi, 1992. "Effects of Growth, Relative Price and Preferences on Food and Nutrition," Indian Economic Review, Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, vol. 27, pages 303-323.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. John Gilbert & Nilanjan Banik, 2010. "Socioeconomic Impacts of Cross-Border Transport Infrastructure Development in South Asia," Working Papers id:3105, eSocialSciences.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2008-013. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Shamprasad M. Pujar).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.