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The Reform of the Pension System in Italy

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  • A. Javier Hamann

Abstract

Italy’s pension system was reformed in August 1995. The new system has various desirable long-run properties and, overall, it represents an improvement over earlier systems. However, it fails to address two longstanding problems: extremely high contribution rates, and a lack of provisions for dealing with the substantial deterioration in demographic ratios expected over the next 30-40 years.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 97/18.

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Length: 34
Date of creation: 01 Feb 1997
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:97/18

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Cited by:
  1. Whitehouse, Edward, 2001. "Pension systems in 15 countries compared: the value of entitlements," MPRA Paper 14751, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Agar Brugiavini & Vincenzo Galasso, 2003. "The Social Security Reform Process in Italy: Where do We Stand?," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp052, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  3. John McHale, 2001. "The Risk of Social Security Benefit-Rule Changes: Some International Evidence," NBER Chapters, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, in: Risk Aspects of Investment-Based Social Security Reform, pages 247-290 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Maclennan, Duncan & Muellbauer, John & Stephens, Mark, 1998. "Asymmetries in Housing and Financial Market Institutions and EMU," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(3), pages 54-80, Autumn.
  5. Franco, Daniele, 2001. "Italy: The Search for a Sustainable PAYG Pension System," Discussion Paper, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University 10, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  6. Robert Fenge & Martin Werding, 2004. "Ageing and the tax implied in public pension schemes: simulations for selected OECD countries," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 25(2), pages 159-200, June.
  7. James, Estelle, 1998. "New Models for Old-Age Security: Experiments, Evidence, and Unanswered Questions," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 271-301, August.
  8. Scopelliti, Alessandro Diego, 2009. "Current Features and Future Problems of the Italian Pension System," MPRA Paper 20077, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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