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How Macroeconomic Factors Affect Income Distribution

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  • Michael Sarel
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    Abstract

    This study develops a cross-section empirical framework to examine the relationship between the macroeconomic environment and trends in income distribution. The macroeconomic variables that are found to be associated with an improvement in income distribution are higher growth rate, higher income level, higher investment rate, real depreciation (especially for low-income countries), and improvement in terms of trade. The estimated significant effects of growth, income, and investment provide evidence that policies designed to promote investment and growth are likely also to contribute to an improvement in income distribution.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 97/152.

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    Length: 25
    Date of creation: 01 Nov 1997
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:97/152

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    1. Klaus Deininger & Lyn Squire, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," CEMA Working Papers, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics 512, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
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    7. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1998. "New ways of looking at old issues: inequality and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 259-287.
    8. Khoo, L. & Dennis, B., 1999. "Income Inquality, Fertility Choice, and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence," Papers, Harvard - Institute for International Development 687, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
    9. Beyer, Harald & Rojas, Patricio & Vergara, Rodrigo, 1999. "Trade liberalization and wage inequality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 103-123, June.
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    13. Spilimbergo, Antonio & Londono, Juan Luis & Szekely, Miguel, 1999. "Income distribution, factor endowments, and trade openness," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 77-101, June.
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    17. Lustig, N. & Mcleod, D., 1996. "Minimum Wages and Poverty in Developing Countries : Some Empirical Evidence," Papers, Brookings Institution - Working Papers 125, Brookings Institution - Working Papers.
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    Cited by:
    1. Ali Abdel Gadir Ali, . "Can the Sudan Reduce Poverty by Half by the Year 2015?," API-Working Paper Series 0304, Arab Planning Institute - Kuwait, Information Center.
    2. Frances Stewart, . "Adjustment and Poverty in Asia: Old Solutions and New Problems -," QEH Working Papers, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford qehwps20, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    3. Frances Stewart, . "Income Distribution and Development," QEH Working Papers, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford qehwps37, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.

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