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After the Crisis

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Author Info

  • Franziska Ohnsorge
  • Ashoka Mody

Abstract

We estimate consumption dynamics in the G-7 economies, paying particular attention to the possibility of precautionary behavior in the face of uncertainty. We find that in the short run, continued income uncertainty will significantly dampen consumption growth. As such, consumption in the G-7 economies is unlikely to be the engine that revives global growth. Differences in the pace and timing of consumption moderation have implications for the evolution of global imbalances. With the U.S. experiencing a sharper rise in unemployment and, perhaps, more widespread loss of financial wealth than elsewhere in the G-7, the relative rise of the U.S. savings rate is helping narrow global imbalances. But with a likely earlier recovery in the U.S., this narrowing could be short-lived. Moreover, long-term differences- in economic and financial volatility and in demographic structures-have been an important source of the imbalances and could soon reassert their prominence.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 10/11.

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Length: 32
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:10/11

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Related research

Keywords: Savings; Aging; Economic growth; Economic models; Economic recovery; Global Financial Crisis 2008-2009; Group of seven; Unemployment; consumption; business cycles; current account adjustment; consumption growth; disposable income; household wealth; income growth; private consumption; national savings; dependent variable; demographic factors; reduction in consumption; real returns; distribution of income; permanent income; consumption behavior; level of consumption; real interest rate; income effect; demand for consumption; consumer price index; demographic structure; implications for consumption; permanent income hypothesis; future consumption; consumption goods; consumption function; consumer behavior; social security; labor income; future consumption growth; personal consumption;

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References

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  1. Martin S. Feldstein, 2008. "Resolving the Global Imbalance: The Dollar and the U.S. Saving Rate," NBER Working Papers 13952, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Nicholas Bloom, 2007. "The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks," NBER Working Papers 13385, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Jiri Slacalek, 2006. "What Drives Personal Consumption?: The Role of Housing and Financial Wealth," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 647, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. John Y. Campbell & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1989. "Consumption, Income, and Interest Rates: Reinterpreting the Time Series Evidence," NBER Working Papers 2924, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2005. "Understanding Changes In International Business Cycle Dynamics," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(5), pages 968-1006, 09.
  6. repec:fth:harver:1435 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Robert J. Barro & Jose F. Ursua, 2008. "Macroeconomic Crises since 1870," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 39(1 (Spring), pages 255-350.
  8. George A. Akerlof, 2009. "How Human Psychology Drives the Economy and Why It Matters," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1175-1175.
  9. Reuven Glick & Kevin J. Lansing, 2009. "U.S. household deleveraging and future consumption growth," FRBSF Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue may15.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Berger, Helge & Nitsch, Volker, 2014. "Wearing corset, losing shape: The euro's effect on trade imbalances," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 136-155.
  2. Ansgar Belke & Christian Dreger, 2011. "Current Account Imbalances in the Euro Area: Catching up or Competitiveness?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1106, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  3. Ansgar Belke & Christian Dreger, 2013. "Current Account Imbalances in the Euro Area: Does Catching up Explain the Development?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 6-17, 02.

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