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Tax and Welfare Reforms in the Czech Republic

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  • Thomas Dalsgaard

Abstract

The paper provides an analysis and discussion of key structural implications of the 2007 and 2008 welfare and tax reforms in the Czech Republic. Based on a detailed micro-study of marginal and average effective tax rates for individuals at various points along the earnings curve, it concludes that while incentives to save and invest have improved, work incentives are being severely hampered by high marginal effective tax rates for low- and middle income individuals. The reforms also fail to address the most pressing fiscal concern: to put government finances on a sustainable path.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 08/52.

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Length: 52
Date of creation: 01 Mar 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:08/52

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Related research

Keywords: Tax reforms; Labor markets; Income distribution; tax rates; taxation; effective tax rates; tax credits; personal income tax; tax system; vat rate; tax credit; tax cuts; corporate income tax; flat tax; environmental taxes; marginal tax rate; tax increases; tax base; tax structure; fiscal gap; flat taxes; tax reform; marginal tax rates; tax burden; tax revenue; tax wedge; government spending; tax changes; corporate tax rate; tax competition; investment tax credit; tax subsidy; income tax cuts; public finance; income tax rates; flat tax reforms; income groups; international tax; corporate income tax base; earned income tax credit; fiscal sustainability; spending cuts; tax ratios; tax returns; tax administration; tax policy; investment tax credits; income scale; income taxes; government deficit; property tax; increase in expenditures; flat income tax; real estate tax; tax cut; tax revenues; tax preferences; income effect; taxable income; public spending; fiscal pressures; tax incentives; tax systems; fiscal reform; fiscal position; international tax competition; total tax revenue; fiscal stance; budgetary impact; environmental tax; personal income taxes; indirect taxation; tax forms; progressive tax; tax on dividends; budgetary improvements; fiscal outlook; public finances; international taxation; filing tax returns; tax measures; public expenditure; deficit reduction; indirect taxes; fiscal implications; corporate tax base; income tax system; taxation of capital income; fiscal package; excise tax; long-term fiscal sustainability; fiscal deficit; optimal tax; fiscal concern;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Marcin Piatkowski & Mariusz Jarmuzek, 2008. "Zero Corporate Income Tax in Moldova," IMF Working Papers 08/203, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Nikolay Galabov, 2009. "The Flat Tax – Theory and Practice," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 2, pages 3-18.
  3. Nikolay Galabov, 2013. "Budget revenues of Bulgaria and of the European Union (2000-2011) (English)," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 2, pages 27-49.
  4. Sònia Muñoz & Céline Allard, 2008. "Challenges to Monetary Policy in the Czech Republic," IMF Working Papers 08/72, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Leibfritz, Willi, 2011. "Undeclared economic activity in central and eastern Europe -- how taxes contribute and how countries respond to the problem," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5923, The World Bank.
  6. Nikolay Galabov, 2009. "The Flat Tax – Theory and Practice," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 7, pages 124-137.
  7. Dennis P. J. Botman & Anita Tuladhar, 2008. "Tax and Pension Reform in the Czech Republic-Implications for Growth and Debt Sustainability," IMF Working Papers 08/125, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Nikolay Galabov, 2013. "Budget revenues of Bulgaria and of the European Union (2000-2011) (Bulgarian)," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 2, pages 3-26.
  9. Zdeněk Hrdlička & Jana Ištvánfyová & Leoš Vítek, 2010. "The System of Accounting for Government Tax Revenues," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(2), pages 253-270.
  10. Nikolay Galabov, 2012. "Tax Neutrality and Tax Expenses in the Practice of Bulgaria," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 1, pages 83-104.
  11. Richard M. Bird & Michael Smart, 2012. "Financing Social Expenditures in Developing Countries: Payroll or Value Added Taxes?," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University paper1206, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

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