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Will a Regional Bloc Enlarge?

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  • Giorgia Albertin

Abstract

This paper investigates whether a regional bloc would enlarge or remain stagnant in size using a model where enlargement is the endogenous outcome of the interaction between the supply of and demand for membership. We show that a maximum size of the bloc exists beyond which the regional policy-maker will be unwilling to enlarge further, and that either the supply side or the demand side of membership might be binding in the determination of the equilibrium size of the bloc. Furthermore, we analyze how the deepening of integration within a regional bloc affects its width. We show that deeper integration may lead to wider integration when the demand side of membership is binding in the determination of the equilibrium size of the bloc, while the equilibrium size of the bloc will be unaffected when the supply side of membership is binding.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 07/69.

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Length: 33
Date of creation: 01 Mar 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:07/69

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Related research

Keywords: Trade relations; bloc trade; regional bloc; trade costs; member country; trading blocs; regionalism; economic integration; international trade; trade agreements; multilateralism; trade policy options; regional trade agreements; regional integration; regional trade; elasticity of substitution; free entry; perfect competition; imperfect competition; world trade; interest groups; competition effect; world trade organization; consumption demand; differentiated products; preferential trade agreement; world demand; regional blocs; free trade; preferential trade; non-member countries; international trade agreements; trade agreement; agreement on trade; political economy; trade flows;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

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  1. Bond, Eric W. & Syropoulos, Constantinos, 1996. "The size of trading blocs Market power and world welfare effects," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-4), pages 411-437, May.
  2. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1975. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 64, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  3. Grossman, G.M. & Helpman, E., 1992. "Protection for Sale," Papers 162, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs.
  4. Winters, L. Alan, 1996. "Regionalism versus Multilateralism," CEPR Discussion Papers 1525, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Theo Eicher & Thomas Osang, 2002. "Protection for Sale: An Empirical Investigation: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1702-1710, December.
  6. Bernheim, B Douglas & Whinston, Michael D, 1986. "Menu Auctions, Resource Allocation, and Economic Influence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 101(1), pages 1-31, February.
  7. Etro, Federico & Ageloni, Ignazio & Alesina, Alberto, 2005. "International Unions," Scholarly Articles 4553008, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  8. Desruelle, Dominique & Richardson, Martin, 1997. "Fortress Europe: Jericho or Chateau d'If?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 32-46, February.
  9. Masahisa Fujita & Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 2001. "The Spatial Economy: Cities, Regions, and International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262561476, December.
  10. Richard Baldwin, 1993. "A Domino Theory of Regionalism," NBER Working Papers 4465, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Devashish Mitra & Dimitrios D. Thomakos & Mehmet A. Ulubaşoglu, 2002. ""Protection For Sale" In A Developing Country: Democracy Vs. Dictatorship," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 497-508, August.
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