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What Drives China's Growing Role in Africa?

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  • Jian-Ye Wang
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    Abstract

    What role does China play in Africa''s development? What drives China''s increasing economic involvement in the continent? This paper attempts to provide a quantified assessment of China''s multifaceted influence as market, donor, financer and investor, and contractor and builder. Though in the past official development aid predominated, the paper argues that government policies, markets for each other''s exports, Africa''s demand for infrastructure, and differences in China''s approach to financing have together moved commercial activities-trade and investment-to the center of China-Africa economic relations. While China''s public sector, state financial institutions in particular, has been instrumental in the process, the influence of its private sector is increasing. Implications for the future of China-Africa economic relations are briefly noted.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 07/211.

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    Length: 30
    Date of creation: 01 Aug 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:07/211

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    Keywords: Trade; Capital flows; loans; debt; debt relief; terms of trade; interest; external trade; merchandise trade; export credit; credit insurance; repayment; export price; regional integration; economic cooperation; foreign trade; trade pattern; debt sustainability; free trade; global trading; bond market; external debt; import price; transport equipment; world trade; commercial policies; debt financing; investment flows; obligations; international trade; trade impact; export growth; multilateral trade; domestic economy; bank loans; trade data; multilateral institutions; world demand; global supply; trade in services; multilateral trade liberalization; export sectors; bilateral agreements; preferential tariff treatment; equal treatment; regulatory framework; free trade area; overdue obligations; preferential tariff; import products; free trade arrangements; trade arrangements; trading blocs; expanding trade; line of credit; trade liberalization; liabilities; trade area; commercial loans; world trade organization; export earnings; credit market; competitive position; border trade; trade patterns; public expenditure; market trends; debt forgiveness;

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    1. World Economic Forum & World Bank & African Development Bank, 2007. "The Africa Competitiveness Report 2007," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6612, October.
    2. Andrea Goldstein & Nicolas Pinaud & Helmut Reisen, 2006. "The Rise of China and India: What's in it for Africa?," OECD Development Centre Policy Insights 19, OECD Publishing.
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    Cited by:
    1. Suhas Ketkar & Dilip Ratha, 2009. "Innovative Financing for Development," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6549, October.
    2. Yin-Wong Cheung & Xingwang Qian, 2009. "The Empirics of China's Outward Direct Investment," CESifo Working Paper Series 2621, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Barnebeck Andersen,Thomas & Barslund, Mikkel & Worm Hansen, Casper & Harr, Thomas & Sandholt Jensen, Peter, 2013. "How much did China’s WTO accession increase economic growth in resource-rich countries?," CEPS Papers 8471, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    4. Ratha, Dilip & Mohapatra, Sanket & Plaza, Sonia, 2008. "Beyond aid : new sources and innovative mechanisms for financing development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4609, The World Bank.
    5. Mary-Françoise Renard, 2011. "Working Paper 126 - China’s Trade and FDI in Africa," Working Paper Series 297, African Development Bank.

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