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The Magnitude and Distribution of Fuel Subsidies

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Author Info

  • Robert Gillingham
  • David Locke Newhouse
  • David Coady
  • Kangni Kpodar
  • Moataz El-Said
  • Paulo A. Medas

Abstract

With the recent jump in world oil prices, the issue of petroleum product pricing has become increasingly important in developing countries. Reflecting a reluctance of many governments to pass these price increases onto energy users, energy price subsidies are absorbing an increasing share of scarce public resources. This paper identifies the issues that need to be discussed when analyzing the fiscal and social costs of fuel subsidies. Using examples from analyses recently undertaken for five countries, it also identifies the magnitude of consumer subsidies and their fiscal implications. The results of the analysis show that-in all of these countries-energy subsidies have significant social and fiscal costs and are badly targeted.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 06/247.

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Length: 37
Date of creation: 01 Nov 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:06/247

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Related research

Keywords: Energy prices; Subsidies; subsidy; consumer subsidies; domestic prices; safety net; world prices; price subsidies; import price; export price; income distribution; domestic production; oil prices; consumer subsidy; producer subsidies; price subsidy; domestic consumption; energy subsidies; world price; domestic price; social safety net; safety net programs; neighboring countries; import prices; elasticity of substitution; political economy; value-added tax; cash transfer; world ? price; oil imports; domestic demand; transfer programs; protection system; domestic taxes; oil-producing countries; safety net program; producer subsidy; subsidization; domestic market; perfect substitutes; social safety net programs; trade flow; indirect taxes; social unrest; transport costs; safety nets; world market; net exporters; tariff structure; transition countries; domestic firms; intermediate inputs; value-added taxes; food subsidies; sales taxes; targeted social safety net; trade taxes; safety net system; cash transfer programs; transition economies; export prices; conditional cash transfer; education subsidies; intermediate goods;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

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  1. Rawlings, Laura B. & Rubio, Gloria M., 2003. "Evaluating the impact of conditional cash transfer programs : lessons from Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3119, The World Bank.
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