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Africa's Trade Revisted

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  • Natalia T. Tamirisa
  • Arvind Subramanian

Abstract

The popular impression that Africa has not integrated into world trade, as suggested by the evolution in simple indicators, has been called into question recently by more formal analysis. This paper refines and generalizes this analysis, but lends support to the popular view of disintegration. Africa, especially Francophone Africa, is currently under-exploiting its trading opportunities and has witnessed disintegration over time, a trend that is most pronounced in its trade with the technologically advanced countries.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 01/33.

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Length: 31
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:01/33

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  1. Helpman, Elhanan, 1984. "Increasing returns, imperfect markets, and trade theory," Handbook of International Economics, in: R. W. Jones & P. B. Kenen (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 7, pages 325-365 Elsevier.
  2. Alan Deardorff, 1998. "Determinants of Bilateral Trade: Does Gravity Work in a Neoclassical World?," NBER Chapters, in: The Regionalization of the World Economy, pages 7-32 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "Natural openness and good government," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2411, The World Bank.
  4. Coe, David T & Helpman, Elhanan & Hoffmaister, Alexander, 1995. "North-South R&D Spillovers," CEPR Discussion Papers 1133, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Sachs, Jeffrey D & Warner, Andrew M, 1997. "Sources of Slow Growth in African Economies," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 6(3), pages 335-76, October.
  6. Bergstrand, Jeffrey H, 1985. "The Gravity Equation in International Trade: Some Microeconomic Foundations and Empirical Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(3), pages 474-81, August.
  7. Foroutan, Faezeh & Pritchett, Lant, 1993. "Intra - Sub - Saharan African trade : is it too little?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1225, The World Bank.
  8. Lawrence H. Summers, 1991. "Regionalism and the world trading system," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 295-301.
  9. repec:fth:coluec:9596-04 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Coe, David T & Hoffmaister, Alexander W, 1999. "North-South Trade: Is Africa Unusual?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 8(2), pages 228-56, July.
  11. Deardoff, A.V., 1995. "Determinants of Bilateral Trade: Does Gravity Work in a Neoclassical World?," Working Papers 382, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  12. Arvind Subramanian, 2000. "Trade and Trade Policies in Eastern and Southern Africa," IMF Occasional Papers 196, International Monetary Fund.
  13. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1997. "Regional Trading Blocs in the World Economic System," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 72.
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Cited by:
  1. Mattoo, Aaditya & Roy, Devesh & Subramanian, Arvind, 2002. "The Africa Growth and Opportunity Act and its rules of origin : generosity undermined?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2908, The World Bank.
  2. Arvind Subramanian & Devesh Roy, 2001. "Who Can Explain the Mauritian Miracle," IMF Working Papers 01/116, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Anna Maria Mayda & Chad Steinberg, 2008. "Do South-South Trade Agreements Increase Trade? Commodity-Level Evidence from COMESA," Development Working Papers 247, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  4. Douillet, Mathilde, 2012. "Trade policies and agricultural exports of Sub-Saharan African countries: Some stylized facts and perspectives," MPRA Paper 40962, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2010. "The rationale for South-South trade; An Alternative Approach," MPRA Paper 26354, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Shafaeddin, Mehdi, 2008. "South-South Regionalism And Trade Cooperation In The Asia-Pacific Region," MPRA Paper 10886, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Bigsten, Arne & Durevall, Dick, 2002. "Is Globalisation Good for Africa?," Working Papers in Economics 67, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  8. Arvind Subramanian & Aaditya Mattoo & Devesh Roy, 2002. "The Africa Growth and Opportunity Act and its Rules of Origin," IMF Working Papers 02/158, International Monetary Fund.

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