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Sex Discrimination and Growth

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Author Info

  • Berta Esteve-Volart

Abstract

This paper argues that sex discrimination is an inefficient practice. We model sex discrimination as the complete exclusion of females from the labor market or as the exclusion of females from managerial positions. The former implies a reduction in GDP per capita; the latter distorts the allocation of talent and lowers economic growth. Both imply lower female-to-male schooling ratios. Our model predicts a convex relationship between nondiscrimination and growth. Although discrimination is difficult to measure, it will be reflected in schooling differentials. We present evidence based on cross-country regressions that is consistent with a convex relationship between schooling differentials and growth.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 00/84.

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Length: 36
Date of creation: 01 Apr 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:00/84

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Related research

Keywords: Economic growth; Labor market policy; Economic models; primary education; sex discrimination; primary schooling; primary enrollment; female education; enrollment rates; primary school; discrimination against women; primary enrollment rates; gender inequality; female population; female entrepreneurs; enrollment ratio; discrimination in education; female workers; sex discrimination in education; gross enrollment; gender discrimination; women entrepreneurs; access to schooling; enrollment rate; primary school age; primary enrollment rate; girls; sexual division of labor; policy research report on gender; gender equality; costs of education; sex discrimination against women;

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Cited by:
  1. Seguino, Stephanie, 2011. "Help or Hindrance? Religion's Impact on Gender Inequality in Attitudes and Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1308-1321, August.
  2. Mina Baliamoune-Lutz, 2007. "Gender Inequality and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa and Arab Countries," ICER Working Papers, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research 25-2007, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
  3. Stephanie Seguino, 2008. "Gender, Distribution, and Balance of Payments (revised 10/08)," Working Papers, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst wp133_revised, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  4. Chicha, Marie-Thérèse, 2013. "Inégalités de genre et pratiques d'entreprise au Maroc," ILO Working Papers, International Labour Organization 482133, International Labour Organization.
  5. Arestoff, Florence & Granger, Clotilde, 2004. "Does Trade Openess Affect Core Labor Standards ?," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University 123456789/6264, Paris Dauphine University.
  6. Melchor Fernandez & Yolanda Pena-Boquete, 2011. "Macroeconomic consequences of gender discrimination: a preliminary approach (refereed paper)," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1066, European Regional Science Association.
  7. Berta Esteve-Volart, 2004. "Gender discrimination and growth: theory and evidence from India," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 6641, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  8. World Bank, 2010. "Arab Republic of Egypt : Gender assessment 2010," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3003, The World Bank.
  9. Yolanda Pena-Boquete & Melchor Fernandez, 2011. "Could gender wage discrimination explain regional differences in productivity?," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1272, European Regional Science Association.
  10. Joshua Comenetz & Ales Bulir & Zuzana Brixiova, 2001. "The Gender Gap in Education in Eritrea in 1991-1998," IMF Working Papers 01/94, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Sedgley, Norman & Elmslie, Bruce, 2006. "Discrimination and growth: The distribution across skills matters," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 194-199, February.

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