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Fiscal Reform Over Ten Years of Transition

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  • George C. Tsibouris
  • Vito Tanzi
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    Abstract

    This paper analyzes fiscal reforms in transition economies during the decade leading up to 1998. The paper argues that macroeconomic stabilization, price liberalization and privatization—the core reforms visualized by the shock therapy approach—are necessary but not sufficient conditions for a complete transition to a market economy. Further deep changes—such as the creation of new fiscal institutions, changes in incentives and processes, and changes in the role of government—are needed.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 00/113.

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    Length: 31
    Date of creation: 01 Jun 2000
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:00/113

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    Cited by:
    1. Solanko, Laura, 2001. "Fiscal competition in a transition economy," BOFIT Discussion Papers 4/2001, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    2. Scott Gehlbach, 2003. "Taxability, Elections, and Government Support of Business Activity," Working Papers w0030, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    3. Jeni Klugman & John Micklewright & Gerry Redmond & UNICEF - United Nations Children's Fund, 2002. "Poverty in the Transition: Social expenditures and the working-age poor," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa02/18, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
    4. Profeta, Paola & Puglisi, Riccardo & Scabrosetti, Simona, 2013. "Does democracy affect taxation and government spending? Evidence from developing countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 684-718.
    5. Joanna Siwinska-Gorzelak, 2000. "Currency Crises and Fiscal Imbalances. The Transition Countries Perspective," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0219, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Scott Gehlbach, 2003. "Taxability and Low-Productivity Traps," Working Papers w0029, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    7. Evelin, Ahermaa & Luigi, Bernardi, 2004. "Tax polici in new EU members: Estonia and othr Baltic states," MPRA Paper 18158, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Oybek Yuldashev & Obid Khakimov, 2011. "Income Taxation And Labor Force Participation In Transition Economies: Evidence From Bulgaria, Russian Federation And Serbia," Anadolu University Journal of Social Sciences, Anadolu University, vol. 11(3), pages 177-198, September.
    9. Crivelli, Ernesto, 2013. "Fiscal impact of privatization revisited: The role of tax revenues in transition economies," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 217-232.
    10. Jan Svejnar, 2006. "Strategies for growth : Central and Eastern Europe," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 205-233.
    11. Jan Svejnar, 2001. "Transition Economies: Performances and Challenges," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 415, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    12. István Benczes, 2001. "Stability Pact for Hungary? Rise of Third Generation Reforms," CERT Discussion Papers 0103, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    13. John E. Anderson, 2005. "Fiscal Reform and its Firm-Level Effects in Eastern Europe and Central Asia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp800, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    14. Mokhtari, Manouchehr & Ashtari, Mamak, 2012. "Understanding tax reform in the Central Asian Republics," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 168-178.
    15. Scott Gehlbach, 2003. "Taxability and Government Support of Business Activity: Testing Theories of Social-Contract Failure," Working Papers w0028, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).

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