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Globalization and Catching-Up

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  • Gregorz W. Kolodko
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    Abstract

    The transitional recession in countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union has lasted much longer than expected. The legacy of the past and recent policy mistakes have both contributed to the slow progress. As structural reforms and gradual institution building have taken hold, the post-socialist economies have started to recover, with some leading countries building momentum toward faster growth. There is a possibility that in the wider context of globalization several of these emerging market economies will be able to catch up with the more advanced industrial economies in a matter of one or two generations.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by International Monetary Fund in its series IMF Working Papers with number 00/100.

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    Length: 51
    Date of creation: 01 Jun 2000
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:00/100

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    Related research

    Keywords: Transition economies; Economic growth; Economic recession; transition countries; gdp per capita; external shocks; gdp growth; world economy; growth cycles; growth rate; business cycle; national income; trade liberalization; capital formation; process of integration; real gdp; global scale; political economy; multinational corporations; regional integration; transition period; world trade; skilled labor; regional trade; transnational corporations; growth rates; political decisions; price fluctuations; private consumption; economic liberalization; transition economy; commodity prices; trade partners; accession negotiations; trade bloc; full liberalization; free entry; gross domestic product; income distribution; liberalized market; brain drain; world trade organization; commodity exchanges; inflation stabilization; trade policies; global markets; terms of trade;

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    Cited by:
    1. Grzegorz W. Kolodko, 2001. "Postsocialist Transformation," Revue d'Économie Financière, Programme National Persée, vol. 6(1), pages 147-159.
    2. Nikolay Nenovsky & Kalina Dimitrova, 2002. "Dual Inflation Under the Currency Board: The Challenges of Bulgarian EU Accession," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 487, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Arratibel, Olga & Rodriguez-Palenzuela, Diego & Thimann, Christian, 2002. "Inflation dynamics and dual inflation in accession countries: a 'New Keynesian' perspective," Working Paper Series 0132, European Central Bank.
    4. Roland Gillet & Yves Wagner, 2002. "Les phénomènes de globalisation," Reflets et perspectives de la vie économique, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(1), pages 115-130.
    5. D. Mario Nuti, 2000. "The Costs and Benefits of Euro-sation in Central-Eastern Europe Before or Instead of EMU Membership," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 340, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    6. Süppel, Ralph, 2003. "Comparing economic dynamics in the EU and CEE accession countries," Working Paper Series 0267, European Central Bank.

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