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EU Agricultural Policy: What Developing Countries Need to Know

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Author Info

  • Alan Matthews
  • Jean-Christophe Bureau

Abstract

This paper provides a consolidated, up-to-date overview of the changes to the CAP and the factors making for further reform from the particular perspective of decision-makers in developing countries. It discusses the principles and mechanisms by which EU farmers are supported under the CAP, and the way in which these mechanisms have been changing since the first major reform of the CAP was adopted in 1992. The main pressures for further reform of the CAP are identified, emphasising the political economy of further reform to provide some sense to developing country policy-makers of how these pressures for reform might play out in the future. Taking a horizontal approach, the impact of reform on developing countries of the three main policy instruments – domestic support, border protection and export subsidies – are then discussed, followed by a focus on a few commodities of particular interest to developing countries. The conclusion develops a checklist of factors which developing country policymakers can use to help track the evolution of the debate on CAP reform and its impact on developing countries.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by IIIS in its series The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series with number iiisdp91.

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Date of creation: 15 Dec 2005
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Handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp91

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Keywords: Common Agricultural Policy; Agricultural trade; WTO; developing countries.;

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References

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  1. Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Jean, S Bastien & Matthews, Alan, 2006. "The consequences of agricultural trade liberalization for developing countries: distinguishing between genuine benefits and false hopes," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(02), pages 225-249, July.
  2. Jean-Christophe Bureau & Antoine Bouet, Yvan Decreux, Sébastien Jean, 2005. "Multilateral agricultural trade liberalization: The contrasting fortunes of developing countries in the Doha Round," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp060, IIIS.
  3. Hannah Chalplin & Alan Matthews, 2005. "Coping with the fallout for preference-receiving countries from EU sugar reform," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp100, IIIS.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Alan Matthews & Hannah Chaplin & Thomas Giblin & Marian Mraz, 2007. "Strengthening Policy Coherence for Development in Agricultural Policy: Policy Recommendations to Irish Aid," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp188, IIIS.
  2. Antimiani, Alessandro & Conforti, Piero & Salvatici, Luca, 2007. "Assessing Market Access: Do Developing Countries Really Get a Preferential Treatment?," Economics & Statistics Discussion Papers esdp07036, University of Molise, Dept. EGSeI.
  3. Soheir Aboulenein & Heba El Laithy & Omneia Helmy & Hanaa Kheir-El-Din & Liudmyla Kotusenko & Maryla Maliszewska & Dina Mandour & Wojciech Paczynski, 2010. "Global Food Price Shock and the Poor in Egypt and Ukraine," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 403, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  4. Alessandro Antimiani & Piero Conforti & Luca Salvatici, 2008. "Measuring Restrictiveness of Bilateral Trade Policies: A Comparison between Developed and Developing Countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 144(2), pages 207-224, July.
  5. Emma J. Dillon & Thia Hennessy & Stephen Hynes & Verena Commins, 2008. "Assessing the Sustainability of Irish Agriculture," Working Papers 0809, Rural Economy and Development Programme,Teagasc.
  6. Dillon, Emma J. & Hennessy, Thia C. & Hynes, Stephen, 2009. "Towards Measurement of Farm Sustainability - an Irish case study," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51786, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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