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A retrospective on Friedman's theory of permanent income

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  • Costas Meghir

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Yale University)

Abstract

Friedman's book on the Óƒonsumption FunctionÔ is one of the great works of Economics demonstrating how the interplay between theoretical ideas and data analysis could lead to major policy implications. We present a short review of Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis, the origins of the idea and its theoretical foundations. We give a brief overview of its influence in modern economics and discuss some relevant empirical results and the way they relate to the original approach taken by Friedman.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its series IFS Working Papers with number W04/01.

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Length: 27 pp
Date of creation: Jan 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:04/01

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Keywords: Friedman; consumption function; permanent income hypothesis;

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References

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  1. Peter Gottschalk & Robert Moffitt, 1994. "The Growth of Earnings Instability in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(2), pages 217-272.
  2. Glenn R. Hubbard & Jonathan Skinner & Stephen P. Zeldes, . "Precautionary Saving and Social Insurance," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 3-95, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  3. Christopher D. Carroll, 1992. "The Buffer-Stock Theory of Saving: Some Macroeconomic Evidence," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(2), pages 61-156.
  4. Griliches, Zvi, 1977. "Estimating the Returns to Schooling: Some Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(1), pages 1-22, January.
  5. John M. Abowd & David Card, 1986. "On the Covariance Structure of Earnings and Hours Changes," NBER Working Papers 1832, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Essig, Lothar, 2004. "Precautionary saving and old-age provisions: Do subjective saving motives measures work?," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 05-22, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim & Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
  2. Aaberge, Rolf & Mogstad, Magne, 2010. "On the Measurement of Long-Term Income Inequality and Income Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 4699, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Keshab Bhattarai, 2005. "Consumption, investment and financial intermediation in a Ramsey model," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 1(6), pages 329-333, November.
  4. Lothar Essig, 2005. "Precautionary saving and old-age provisions: Do subjective saving motive measures work?," MEA discussion paper series 05084, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  5. Andreas Knabe & Steffen Rätzel, 2007. "Quantifying the Psychological Costs of Unemployment: The Role of Permanent Income," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 32, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  6. Quan Gan & Robert J. Hill, 2008. "A New Perspective on the Relationship Between House Prices and Income," Discussion Papers 2008-13, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

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