Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The Welfare Effects of Regulating the Number of Market Segments

Contents:

Author Info

  • Yann Braouezec

    ()
    (IESEG School of Management (LEM-CNRS))

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    We consider a model in which a profit-maximizing organization called the monopolist faces N _ 2 different (micro) market segments while the number k of market segments is chosen the regulator, where k is an integer between 1 and N. Unless k = 1 or k = N, the monopolist's profit maximization is a mixed-integer programming problem, the solution of which is called the optimal profit policy. When demands are linear, we show that it is always worthwhile to regulate the number of market segments since the value of k that maximizes the social welfare under the optimal profit policy is never greater than a critical threshold _k. This result allows us to disentangle the good aspect of price discrimination, the so-called output effect, from the bad one, that we call the pure profit effect. Further results are provided for the specific case of parallel demands. Non-linear demands are also briefly considered.

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by IESEG School of Management in its series Working Papers with number 2013-ECO-11.

    as in new window
    Length: 28 pages
    Date of creation: Dec 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ies:wpaper:e201311

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 3, rue de la Digue, FR-59000 Lille
    Phone: +33/320545892
    Fax: +33/320574855
    Web page: http://www.ieseg.fr/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Economics; pricing; market segmentation; direct price discrimination; regulation;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Cowan, Simon & Vickers, John & Aguirre Pérez, Iñaki, 2009. "Monopoly Price Discrimination and Demand Curvature," IKERLANAK 2009-39, Universidad del País Vasco - Departamento de Fundamentos del Análisis Económico I.
    2. Braouezec, Yann, 2012. "Customer-class pricing, parallel trade and the optimal number of market segments," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 605-614.
    3. Le Breton, M. & Weber, S., 1995. "Stability of Coalition Structures and the Principle of Optimal Partitioning," G.R.E.Q.A.M. 95a06, Universite Aix-Marseille III.
    4. Pascal Belan & Stéphane Gauthier & Guy Laroque, 2008. "Optimal grouping of commodities for indirect taxation," Post-Print hal-00731151, HAL.
    5. Malueg, David A. & Schwartz, Marius, 1994. "Parallel imports, demand dispersion, and international price discrimination," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3-4), pages 167-195, November.
    6. Schmalensee, Richard, 1981. "Output and Welfare Implications of Monopolistic Third-Degree Price Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(1), pages 242-47, March.
    7. Varian, Hal R, 1985. "Price Discrimination and Social Welfare," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 870-75, September.
    8. Phlips, Louis, 1988. " Price Discrimination: A Survey of the Theory," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(2), pages 135-67.
    9. John Hartwick, 1976. "Optimal Price Discrimination," Working Papers 237, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    10. Victor Kaftal & Debashis Pal, 2008. "Third Degree Price Discrimination in Linear-Demand Markets: Effects on Number of Markets Served and Social Welfare," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 558-573, October.
    11. Steinberg, Richard & Weisbrod, Burton A., 2005. "Nonprofits with distributional objectives: price discrimination and corner solutions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(11-12), pages 2205-2230, December.
    12. Yong He & Guang-Zhen Sun, 2006. "Income Dispersion And Price Discrimination," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(1), pages 59-74, 02.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ies:wpaper:e201311. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Monika Marin).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.