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Channels Through Which Human Capital Inequality Influences Economic Growth

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  • Amparo Castelló-Climent

    ()
    (Institute of International Economics, University of Valencia)

Abstract

This paper empirically investigates the theoretical predictions of some of the channels through which human capital inequality may discourage investment and growth. In a cross-section of countries over the period 1960-2000, findings reveal that, all other things being equal, a greater degree of human capital inequality increases fertility rates and reduces life expectancy, which in turn hampers the accumulation rates of human capital. This effect is reinforced in the countries where individuals find it difficult to access credit. Extensive sensitivity analyses show the results are robust across specifications and are not driven by atypical observations, endogenous regressors or unobservable heterogeneity.

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File URL: http://iei.uv.es/docs/wp_internos/RePEc/pdf/iei_1101.pdf
File Function: First version, 2011
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Economics Institute, University of Valencia in its series Working Papers with number 1101.

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Length: 47 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iei:wpaper:1101

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Keywords: Human capital inequality; structural form; investment rates; economic growth;

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References

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  1. Daron Acemoglu, 1999. "Changes in Unemployment and Wage Inequality: An Alternative Theory and Some Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1259-1278, December.
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  7. Amparo Castelló-Climent, 2010. "Inequality and growth in advanced economies: an empirical investigation," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 293-321, September.
  8. Amparo Castelló-Climent & Rafael Doménech, 2008. "Human Capital Inequality, Life Expectancy And Economic Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 653-677, 04.
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Cited by:
  1. Amparo Castelló-Climent, 2010. "Inequality and growth in advanced economies: an empirical investigation," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 293-321, September.
  2. Jesus Crespo Cuaresma & Samir K.C. & Petra Sauer, 2013. "Age-Specific Education Inequality, Education Mobility and Income Growth," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 6, WWWforEurope.

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